Page 1 Page 2 Page 3 Page 4 Page 5 Page 6 Page 7 Page 8 Page 9 Page 10 Page 11 Page 12 Page 13 Page 14 Page 15 Page 16 Page 17 Page 18 Page 19 Page 20 Page 21 Page 22 Page 23 Page 24 Page 25 Page 26 Page 27 Page 28 Page 29 Page 30 Page 31 Page 32 Page 33 Page 34 Page 35 Page 36 Page 37 Page 38 Page 39 Page 40 Page 41 Page 42 Page 43 Page 44 Page 45 Page 46 Page 47 Page 48 Page 49 Page 50 Page 51 Page 52 Page 53 Page 54 Page 55 Page 56 Page 57 Page 58 Page 59 Page 60 Page 61 Page 62 Page 63 Page 64 Page 65 Page 66 Page 67 Page 68 Page 69 Page 70 Page 71 Page 72 Page 73 Page 74 Page 75 Page 76 Page 77 Page 78 Page 79 Page 80SPRING 2017 | CompTIAWorld 19 found herself on the executive council. “Later, I met Nancy Hammervik, EVP of Industry Relations at CompTIA, and we got on well,” Pound said. “One day she took me aside and said, ‘We would like to consider you for the Board of Directors,’ at which point I nearly fell off my chair.” Pound jumped at the chance and was proud to be asked back in 2014. “CompTIA is that organization that wants to raise the standards [and] show how technology companies are good at what they do and the vital role technology plays in taking companies to the next level,” Pound said. Her work and experience culminated in being named CompTIA’s Member of the Year for 2016, an honor she calls “absolutely amazing.” “Todd Thibodeaux, CEO and President of CompTIA, rang me and I was at a loss for words,” she said, adding it was humbling to be nominated in the first place, let alone be chosen. “It’s a fantastic honor.” Tracy’s Take on Women in Tech Even as she drives, Pound gets animated when she talks about women in tech, her sapphire eyes flashing with excitement about an issue she’s truly passionate about. “If you take a step back and look at the way a majority of people see tech, it’s understandable why girls aren’t interested. There’s such a lot of unconscious bias in the images that are presented and the words that are used,” she said. Another barrier: Young boys are more likely to be encouraged to play with technology, to take apart and fix things. “In those early, formative years, teachers don’t think about needing to get more girls involved in technology, and parents “If you take a step back and look at the way a majority of people see tech, it’s understandable why girls aren’t interested. There’s such a lot of unconscious bias in the images that are presented and the words that are used,” Pound said.