• Main
  • Members
  • Certification
  • Partners

IT Hall of Fame Members

Previously Inducted Members

ABCDEGHIJKLMNOPRSTUVWXZ

Paul AllenPaul Allen is a member of the 1998 Industry Hall of Fame inductee class.
Allen is a renowned entrepreneur, industry investor and computer programmer. As a co-founder of Microsoft, he helped write the first programs and shape the company's business model. His entrepreneurial career began when he was a software developer for MITS (creator of the Altair Computer). In his off hours, Allen worked closely with Bill Gates to design a BASIC programming language interpreter; resulting in a new product and business venture he coined “Micro-soft."

In 1980, the duo purchased an operating system that they revised to become MS-DOS, which lead to the company's meteoric rise. Allen was diagnosed with Hodgkin's lymphoma in 1982 and, despite successful treatment, he did not return to Microsoft. He remained on the board through 2000 and continued to consult with company executives on strategy and related topics.

Allen started a number of other ventures after Microsoft, including Starwave and Asymetrix, which was reidd Click2learn.com before it merged with Docent and became Sum Total Systems. He also made a number of high profile purchases, such as Marcus Cable, Hollywood Entertainment, the Seattle Seahawks and Portland Trailblazers.

TOP

Steve BallmerSteve Ballmer is a member of the 1997 Industry Hall of Fame inductee class.
Ballmer began a flourishing executive career while still attending Harvard, where he sold ads for the student newspaper, worked on the collegiate literary magazine and managed the football team. After graduation, he served as a product team leader for Proctor and Gamble before deciding to enter the MBA program at Stanford. In 1980, Ballmer reconnected with his Harvard classmate, Bill Gates and was hired as Microsoft's first business manager.

He went on to lead several of divisions within the company before being named president and assuming day-to-day responsibility for the entire organization in 1998. Ballmer was appointed Chief Executive Officer of Microsoft in 2000 and controls overall operations of the business.

He graduated with a bachelor's degree in mathematics and economics from Harvard University in 1977.

Craig BarrettDr. Craig Barrett is a member of the 2006 Industry Hall of Fame inductee class.
As CEO of Intel, Barrett steered the organization through a serious recession and the bursting of the dot-com bubble. After being named the company's fourth president in 1997, he was appointed chief executive officer the following year, a role he would hold until 2005. During his tenure as CEO, Intel made significant investments in research and development, positioning the organization for the challenges and opportunities ahead. His legacy resides in the company's semiconductor manufacturing facilities and its continuing push for advances in education and technology innovation.

Barrett's career at Intel began in 1974 as a manager, leading to corporate vice president in 1984, senior vice president in 1987 and executive vice president in 1990. Elected to Intel's board of directors in 1992, he was named chairman in May, 2005 and remained active in that role until his departure from the organization in January of 2009. Dr. Barrett attended Stanford University in Palo Alto, California from 1957 to 1964, and received his Bachelor of Science, Master of Science and Ph.D. degrees in Materials Science.

Carol BartzCarol Bartz is a member of the 2006 Industry Hall of Fame inductee class.
As president, CEO and Executive Chairman of AutoDesk, Bartz transformed the company from a mid-sized computer-aided design software provider to an international success story. Upon assuming the role of CEO in 1992, she quickly diversified the product portfolio to lessen the company's reliance on a few key markets. Along with that expansion came a greater commitment to its reseller channel and an expanded alliance program, all contributing to a six-fold increase in revenue during her tenure.

Bartz was vice president of worldwide field operations and executive officer of Sun Microsystems prior to joining AutoDesk, and previously held line and sales management positions at the Digital Equipment Corporation and 3M.

As CEO of Yahoo! from 2009 until 2011, Bartz also served on the company's board of directors. She attended William Woods University in Fulton, Missouri, and received a bachelor's degree in computer science from the University of Wisconsin–Madison.

Bell Labs is a member of the 1999 Industry Hall of Fame inductee class.
Founded in 1925 by Western Electric Research Laboratories and the research arm of AT&T's national telephone business, Bell Labs original charter was to design telephone exchange switches. Fortunately, the organization expanded on that goal, receiving more than 32,000 U.S. patents covering a broad range of technologies—from the fax machine and the UNIX operating system to numerous advances in Internet and wireless equipment. Bell Labs employed more than 24,000 researchers and engineers at its peak in 1998 and, despite going through a series of ownership and technology focus changes over the past decade, continues its mission in a number of research facilities in several countries.

Gordon BellGordon Bell is a member of the 2000 Industry Hall of Fame inductee class.
Bell was responsible for a number of innovative new technologies at Digital Equipment Corporation (DEC) and served as Vice President of Engineering from 1972-1983. Over 23 years at the company, he designed a number of computer improvements and spearheaded the development of the organization's VAX and the VAX Computing Environment. Over his career, Bell has been involved in, or responsible for, the development of numerous products at DEC, Encore, Ardent, and several other companies. Projects he headed resulted in more than 30 different computer processing improvements.

Bell co-founded The Computer History Museum with his wife, Gwen, and was named a museum fellow in 2003. His role as a principal researcher at Microsoft included work on telepresence and serving as the principle research subject for the MyLifeBits project, where a team collects and stores all information related to his life (creating a lifelog).

He received both a bachelor's and master's degree in electrical engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT).

Tim Berners-LeeTim Berners-Lee is a member of the 1998 Industry Hall of Fame inductee class.
Berners-Lee is a renowned computer scientist, best identified for his advancements in electronic communications and with the global Internet. While working at the European Particle Physics Laboratory (CERN) in 1989, he devised the World Wide Web, an internet-based hypermedia initiative for global information sharing. Berners-Lee wrote the first web client and server a year later, and his specifications of URIs, HTTP and HTML were refined as Web technology spread. As Director of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C), a Web standards organization founded in 1994, he oversees the research and development of interoperable technologies that expand the Internet's potential.

Berners-Lee serves as a Director of the Web Science Trust (WST), as well as the World Wide Web Foundation. Each of these organizations works to improve research, education and promotion of internet disciplines. Berners-Lee writes extensively on his areas of expertise, including his book, "Weaving the Web."

He received a BA degree from The Queen's College, Oxford University in 1976.

James Bidzos D. James (Jim) Bidzos is a member of the 2000 Industry Hall of Fame inductee class.
As the founder of VeriSign, Bidzos is an Internet and security industry pioneer whose accomplishments include building RSA Security into the early standard-bearer for authentication and encryption. In 1995, he oversaw the spin-off of RSA's certification services business, including licenses to key cryptographic patents. Bidzos served as the first president and CEO of the new company, VeriSign and went on to become chairman of the board. He championed the drive for open Internet commerce and is credited with the commercialized use of public key encryption.

Bidzos was a programmer turned marketing executive when he assumed the responsibility of righting RSA Security's business in 1986, taking on the role as president and CEO. He focused his efforts to educate the market on the potential of the Internet and the importance of computer security. The greater challenge was in deterring the federal government from controlling cryptography development in the name of national security. Bidzos was a champion of both causes during his tenure at both companies. He left RSA Security in 1999 and has served VeriSign in a number of capacities over the years, currently as president, CEO and chairman.

Dave Boucher is a member of the 2000 Industry Hall of Fame inductee class.
A 30-year IBM veteran, Boucher made his mark by promoting a channel go-to-market philosophy. Throughout his career, he organized summits of industry notables and forged crucial connections between the vendor and solution provider communities. Boucher joined IBM in 1970 as a new account sales representative and rose through the ranks by attaining goals and improving his skills. Personal computers would change the game at IBM, setting him on a much different career path. Don Estridge, head of IBM's PC group put Boucher in charge of developing channel relationships in 1983.

In 16 years as IBM's channel manager, he logged more than 3.5 million air miles visiting solution providers. Boucher studied their businesses and recognized the value they brought to both their clients and vendors, like IBM. The summits he ran helped shape the company's channel program, covering warranties, terms, conditions, and price protection. He was an advocate for both IBM and its partners, and mediated disagreements fairly—though under his watch they were a rare occurrence. After retiring from IBM in 2000, he founded Dave Boucher Enterprises to help new technology start-ups succeed.

Paul Brainard Paul Brainerd is a member of the 1997 Industry Hall of Fame inductee class.
Brainerd is the technology innovator and entrepreneur credited with inventing “desktop publishing." In He founded Aldus software in 1984 to create and market software for the new Macintosh computer and printer. Brainerd's PageMaker product virtually transformed the print and publishing industry, allowing anyone with a computer to design and generate a variety of printed materials.

In 1994, he announced that Aldus would merge with Adobe and, in addition to becoming a member of the new company's board of directors; he started a second career in philanthropy. His first activity was to found the Brainerd Foundation, which organized and funded a number of groups with an environmental focus. He followed that by establishing Social Venture Partners, a group of 100 entrepreneurs who invest in philanthropic programs they consider worthwhile.

Brainers received a bachelor's degree in business from the University of Oregon and a master's degree in journalism and mass communication from the University of Minnesota.

Dan Bricklin Dan Bricklin is a member of the 1998 Industry Hall of Fame inductee class.
Bricklin is best known for developing the VisiCalc electronic spreadsheet program with Bob Frankston while he was a student at the Harvard Business School. After graduating, he joined Digital Equipment Corporation (DEC) and was involved in designing a variety of computerized typesetting and editing hardware, including the first standalone word processing system.

Bricklin then started on an entrepreneurial path and founded Software Garden, Inc., where he developed and refined programs for prototyping and simulating other software components. In 1990, he co-founded Slate Corporation and pioneered applications software for electronic pen computing. The market for those devices never materialized, and Bricklin returned to Software Garden. His next creation was the Trellix Corporation, which became the leading provider of private-label web site publishing technology and managed hosting services. Bricklin served as CTO and left in 2004 after the company was acquired by Interland, Inc. He remains president of Software garden.

Bricklin received a BS degree in Electrical Engineering/Computer Science from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and an MBA from the Harvard Graduate School of Business Administration.

John Seely BrownJohn Seely Brown is a member of the 2004 Industry Hall of Fame inductee class.
As the Chief Scientist at the Xerox Corporation, Brown also directed the company's Palo Alto Research Center (PARC)—a position he held for nearly two decades. While leading the research program, he expanded its scope to include organizational learning, knowledge management, complex adaptive systems and MEMs/nano technologies. Brown also cofounded the Institute for Research on Learning (IRL).

In addition to his leadership roles, he continues a number of personal research projects, covering topics such as the management of radical innovation, digital youth culture, digital media, and new forms of communication and learning. Brown is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the National Academy of Education, a Fellow of the American Association for Artificial Intelligence and of AAAS and a Trustee of the MacArthur Foundation.

After receiving bachelor's degrees in mathematics and physics from Brown University in 1962, he went on to the University of Michigan, where he obtained a doctorate in computer and communication sciences in 1970. Brown has been awarded honorary doctorate degrees from a number of prestigious institutions.

TOP

Rod Canion is a member of the 1997 Industry Hall of Fame inductee class.
Canion was a co-founder of Compaq Computer Corporation, and served as Chief Executive Office. He spent the first part of his technology career at Texas Instruments, where he and friends Jim Harris and Bill Mutro devised a plan to start their own disk drive and computer peripherals manufacturing company. But the group was won over by an alternate plan by Ben Rosen, a venture capitalist who offered to help them raise the money to build and market the first portable personal computer that could run IBM software.

In 1983, Canion launched Compaq Computer, which would set a record for first year U.S. corporate sales. He took the company public that same year and guided the company through nearly a decade of exceptional growth. After leaving Compaq in 1992, he and Jim Harris partnered again to start the computer consulting firm, Insource Technologies Corp.

Canion graduated with bachelor's and master's degrees in electrical engineering with an emphasis on computer science from the University of Houston in 1966 and 1968.

Vinton CerfVinton (Vint) Cerf is a member of the 1998 Industry Hall of Fame inductee class.
Cerf is recognized for his contributions to computer science and networking and is often referred to as one of the founding fathers of the Internet. After college, his passion for computing led to join the Defense Department's Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA). As project manager, he was involved in funding and research for a number of internet protocol technologies, eventually helping build the ARPA network. In 1970, the group released the Network Control Protocol (NCP) for basic host-to-host communication, adding a number of other significant internet improvements over the next decade.

He left the program in 1982 to lead MCI's technology strategy. Cerf directed the team of architects and engineers that designed advanced networking frameworks, including a system to deliver data, information, voice and video. The first commercial email system (MCI Mail) resulted from that group's efforts. Cerf also helped found ICANN (the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers), eventually becoming a board member and Chair and, in 1992, he helped establish the Internet Society. In 2005, he joined Google as vice president and chief Internet evangelist, responsible for identifying new enabling technologies to support the development of advanced, Internet-based products and services.

Cerf received a Bachelor of Science degree in Mathematics from Stanford University and Master of Science and Ph.D. degrees in Computer Science from UCLA.

John ChambersJohn Chambers is a member of the 2002 Industry Hall of Fame inductee class.
When he assumed the roles of president and CEO of Cisco Systems in 1995, the company's annual revenue was slightly more than $1 billion. Through an aggressive product development program and a number of strategic acquisitions, Chambers assembled a powerful networking giant with more than $40 billion in sales each year. He emphasizes the company's reseller partnerships and continues to work closely with alliance partners to strengthen their services portfolio. Industry analysts often credit Chamber's vision and guidance for the success of the networking company.

Named to Chairman of the Board in 2006, he was initially Senior Vice President of Worldwide Sales and Operations when he was hired in 1991. Prior to joining Cisco, he served as an executive vice president at Wang Laboratories (1982-1990) and was in a senior sales management position at IBM from 1976-1982.

Chambers has served as Vice Chairman of the President George Bush National Infrastructure Advisory Council (NIAC) and was a member of President Bill Clinton's Trade Policy Committee.

Chambers earned Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science degrees in business from West Virginia University from 1971, and a Juris Doctor from the West Virginia University College of Law in 1974. He later received a Master of Business Administration degree in finance and management from Indiana University in 1975.

James Clark Jim Clark is a member of the 2004 Industry Hall of Fame inductee class.
While he is famous for founding Netscape, Dr. James Clark his entrepreneurial skills began in 1982, when he formed Silicon Graphics with Abbey Silverstone and six Stanford graduate students. The company became went on to become the world leader in the production of Hollywood movie visual effects and 3-D imaging, though Clark left in the early 1990s. His next venture was Netscape, which he founded with Marc Andreessen in 1994. By 1998, the company controlled approximately 80% of the internet browser market, but competition from Windows Explorer caused the company to offer it for free. Clark eventually transitioned the browser to an open-source platform (the Mozilla project) before selling Netscape to AOL in 1998.

Clark continued his entrepreneurial activities, shifting his attention to streamlining medical records technologies as he founded Healtheon, which he merged later with WebMD. In 1999 he launched myCFO to help the well-to-do better manage their money, while he became the original investor in Shutterfly, as well as assuming the chairman of the board role. Clark founded Neoteris in 2000, also becoming the company's chief financial backer and chairman.

He received both a bachelor's and a master's degree in physics from the University of New Orleans, followed by a doctorate in computer science from the University of Utah. In 1979, Clark accepted a position at Stanford University as an associate professor of electrical engineering, a position he held until starting Silicon Graphics in 1982.

Edgar Frank "Ted" CoddEdgar Frank "Ted" Codd is a member of the 2004 Industry Hall of Fame inductee class.
While working for IBM, Codd invented the relational model for database management, the theoretical basis for relational databases. He went on to publish the theory that supports these operations, paving the way for new systems to retrieve and maintain public and business records. His first take on the relational model of data appeared in a 1969 IBM research report, with a revised version published by the Association of Computing Machinery a year later, often referred to as the birth of the relational model. In his landmark paper, "A Relational Model of Data for Large Shared Data Banks," Codd proposed replacing the hierarchical or navigational structure with simple tables containing rows and columns.

His work forms the basis for what is now a multibillion-dollar-a-year business for Oracle, Microsoft and IBM. By 2010, the market for applications employing this model exceeded $10 billion. According to database solution providers, Codd's model eliminated a lot of programming error by reducing the number of procedures and giving them greater flexibility.

After earning degrees in mathematics and chemistry at Oxford University, he joined the Royal Air Force and flew numerous missions during World War II. Codd then came to the U.S. where he studied computer science at the University of Michigan, receiving a doctorate degree in 1967 before joining IBM. He was named an IBM Fellow in 1976 and received the Turing Award, the highest technical honor in computing, in 1981. Codd died on April 18, 2003.

Ed ColliganEd Colligan is a member of the 1999 Industry Hall of Fame inductee class.
Colligan had a long history with Palm, having led the product marketing efforts for the company's original handheld devices in the mid-1990s. Along with Jeff Hawkins and Donna Dubinsky, the trio worked tirelessly to bring the PalmPilot to market. When 3Com purchased the parent company (U.S. Robotics), the three left the organization to establish Handspring, where they would design and market a line of PDAs. Their Treo smartphone line brought together a number of advanced technologies, including an integrated cellular phone, a built-in keyboard to make e-mail access simpler, and SMS functionality.

Colligan was president and chief operating officer of Handspring, and when they merged the company with Palm to create palmOne, he became senior vice president and general manager of the wireless business unit. Colligan was named president of Palm, Inc. in 2004 and a year later he took over the CEO responsibilities. He held both positions until he stepped down in 2009, taking a new role with private equity firm Elevation Partners, one of Palm's major financial backers.

Colligan received a bachelor's degree in political science from the University of Oregon in 1983.

CompTIA A+ Originators are recognized for the work they did in the early 1990s to establish a professional certification that validated foundation level skills for PC repairmen and technicians. Since then more than 825,000 people around the world have become CompTIA A+ certified. CompTIA A+ remains the best credential an individual can have to launch a career in IT. Members of the CompTIA A+ Originators group include James Brann, IBM (deceased); Richard Bulot, Epson America; Dennis Cagan, Century Computing Marketing; Julie Faster, Apple Computer; Dave Garcia, Digital Equipment Corporation: Mark Hiltz, PC Parts; John Hlavac, Packard Bell; Alan Hupp, Drake Training and Technologies; Gus Kolias, Compaq Computer; Tim Kuhlman, Toshiba America; Terry Morrison, IBM; Dennis O'Leary, IBM; Sara Parks, Apple Computer (co-chair); Joe Ciulla, IBM; Marshall Toplansky, US Robotics; Aaron Woods, Intelligent Electronics; Tricia Wurts, Wurts & Associates; and Bill York, CompUSA (co-chair).

Ross Cooley is a member of the 1998 Industry Hall of Fame inductee class.
During his time at Compaq, Cooley helped create and refine the organizations channel-only business model. By investing in its partner community, the PC manufacturer significantly expanded its sales reach and quickly grew its market share. Cooley pioneered the channel chief role and set the standard for the industry, balancing his company's goals with the best interests of their solution providers. Under his leadership, Compaq was the first PC vendor to authorize wholesale distributors and the first to allow VARs to open-source its products.

Cooley left Compaq in 1996 to become CEO of pcOrder.com when the business was spun off from Trilogy Software. The two companied merged in 2000 when Trilogy repurchased the outstanding stock in pcOrder.com. Prior to his 12 years at Compaq, Cooley spent 18 years with IBM.

compaq portableThe Compaq Portable was inducted in the Industry Hall of Fame in 1998.
Introduced in November 1982, the Compaq Portable was the first moveable personal computer that could run the IBM PC software. Released in March 1983 at $2995, the machine was often referred to as a "suitcase computer" due to its size and appearance. Compaq used off-the-shelf components, including the Microsoft operating system (MS-DOS), to build a reasonably priced portable computer. The company did reverse engineer IBM's basic input/output system (BIOS), establishing the process that a vast number of clone manufacturers would follow.

Phil Corcoran is a member of the 2003 Industry Hall of Fame inductee class.
Corcoran worked closely with Comark co-founder Chuck Wolande to build a $1.6 billion solution provider and distribution business. The two shared the same office from the time they started the company (1977) until they sold it to Insight Enterprises in 2002, where they continued that workplace arrangement as vice chairmen. When Corcoran and Wolande launched Communications Marketing (shortened to Comark in 1981) they began by selling Memorex tapes, eventually evolving it into a distributor, mail-order company, systems integrator and solution provider business.

Corcoran was a sales representative with Memorex before founding Comark, and he had a strong desire to start his own business. While he shared management with Wolande, his role was to cultivate relationships, from recruiting and inspiring employees to managing the vendor and client ecosystem. The company grew substantially over the years, due in at least part to the complementary management styles of the two business partners. Corcoran served as chairman of Comark, which employed more than 1500 employees at its pinnacle. After the sale to Comark was completed, he and Wolande became vice-chairmen of Insight.

As a member of the CompTIA board of directors, Corcoran was elected Chair in 2000. He attended St. Mary's College and received a bachelor's degree from Southern Illinois University.

Dave Cutler Dave Cutler is a member of the 2000 Industry Hall of Fame inductee class.
Culter is an accomplished researcher, computer engineer and software designer, holding more than 20 patents in a variety of technologies. When he worked at Digital Equipment Corporation (DEC) in the 1970s, his drive and insight lead him to direct simultaneous projects on a number of occasions. Culter's efforts lead to a variety of new processors and operating systems, which helped fuel the organizations phenomenal growth.

In 1988, he left DEC and brought his operating system design skills to Microsoft. Over the next decade, he guided the development of the company's flagship platforms, including Windows NT, Windows 2000, Windows XP and Windows Server. Cutler was awarded the prestigious Senior Technical Fellow status and shifted his focus to design Microsoft's Live Platform in 2006 and its cloud-based Azure platform in 2008. Dave Cutler was awarded the prestigious status of Senior Technical Fellow at Microsoft.

TOP

Chris DateChris Date is a member of the 2004 Industry Hall of Fame inductee class.
A specialist in relational database technology, Date is also an independent author, lecturer, researcher, and consultant. His book, An Introduction to Database Systems, is used by hundreds of colleges and universities worldwide, widely regarded as one of the fundamental texts on the subject. Date authored a number of other works on database management and speaks at universities and educational forums throughout the world.

Date began his computer career as a mathematical programmer at Leo Computers Ltd. (in London) and then served as a programming instructor for IBM between 1969 and 1974. It was there he met and started collaborating with Edgar F. Codd on the relational model for database management.

Date received a bachelor's degree in Mathematics from Cambridge University (U.K.) in 1962.

Michael DellMichael Dell is a member of the 2003 Industry Hall of Fame inductee class.
In college, he started building computers and selling them directly, with a strong emphasis on customer support and low prices. Although Dell promised his parents he would concentrate more on his education, it was hard to walk away from a business that was generating more than $80,000 a month in sales. So he launched PC's Limited in 1984 with just $1000, pioneering personal computer sales by phone and eventually offering the first toll-free technical support service. Over the years, Dell added a number of products and services to the company's line card, adapting to meet new market opportunities the evolving needs of it customers. PC's Limited was renamed the Dell Computer Corporation prior to its initial public offering in 1988, with Dell becoming chairman of the board of directors and chief executive officer. Now a Fortune 500 company, Dell employs more than 100,000 people and generates more than $50 billion in annual sales.

In 1999, he and his wife established the Michael & Susan Dell Foundation to provide philanthropic support to a variety of global causes. Dell serves on the Foundation Board of the World Economic Forum and the executive committee of the International Business Council. He is also chairman of the Technology CEO Council and is a member of the governing board of the Indian School of Business (in Hyderabad, India) and serves on the board of Catalyst.

Donna Dubinsky Donna Dubinsky is a member of the 1999 Industry Hall of Fame inductee class.
Fresh from Harvard's M.B.A. program, Dubinsky went to work in marketing for Apple. While she had little technical knowledge, the operations and strategy experience she gained in the high tech company would be a tremendous asset to her career. In 1992, Dubinsky co-founded Palm In. with Jeff Hawkins, an engineer and entrepreneur with a prototype hand-held electronic organizer. While handled design, she developed the company strategy and raised the capital that made it a success. They sold Palm to U.S. Robotics in 1995, which 3Com scooped up two years later, just as the company's PalmPilot product was skyrocketing in sales.

In 1998, Dubinsky and Hawkins co-founded Handspring, where they would revolutionize the wireless industry by launching the Treo smartphone. In October 2003, Handspring merged with Palm, where she continued to serve on the board until early 2009.

Dubinsky received a B.A. degree in history from Yale University, and earned an M.B.A. from the Harvard Business School.

TOP

Larry Ellison Larry Ellison is a member of the 1998 Industry Hall of Fame inductee class.
Oracle Corporation began with three employees in 1977 and now employs more than 40,000, with annual sales of $9.5 billion. From the beginning, Ellison served as Chief Executive Officer, the lead salesman and principal strategist. After reading the paper "A Relational Model of Data for Large Shared Data Banks" by Edgar F. ("Ted") Codd, he saw the commercial potential in the concept of a Structured Query Language (SQL). Ellison and his partners won a two-year contract to build a relational database management system (RDBMS) for the CIA, and code named the project “Oracle." The finished product was the foundation the used to develop a commercial application, which IBM adopted for its mainframe systems. Oracle's sales doubled every year for the next seven years, leading Ellis to rename the billion dollar company the Oracle Corporation, for its best-selling product.

Oracle went public in 1986, giving the company the capital needed to grow. Starting in 2004, Ellison set out to increase Oracle's market share through a series of strategic acquisitions, including PeopleSoft, Retek, Siebel Systems, Hyperion Solutions, and Sun Microsystems. In addition to CEO, he served as company president from 1978 to 1996 and Chairman of the Board from 1990 to 1992 and 1995 to 2004.

Douglas Engelbart Douglas Engelbart is a member of the 2001 Industry Hall of Fame inductee class.
Engelbart, who holds the patent for the mouse, is known as the father of interactivity. Through his ideas and work at the Stanford Research Institute and the Augmentation Research Center in the 1960s and 1970s, Engelbart set the stage for graphical editing and windowing, object addressing, hypermedia, version control, teleconferencing and distributed client/server architecture. He also is credited as one of the first people to demonstrate the graphical user interface and the concepts of linking and online collaboration.

Engelbart developed the computer mouse in the 1960s, but its commercial use would come more than 20 years later. After conducting research at NASA and Stanford, he started the Augmentation Research Center, which led to the creation of digital libraries, storage and the retrieval of electronic documents using hypertext. The mouse was used to facilitate computer interaction. Several other technology advances came from his group's work, including on-screen video teleconferencing.

After interrupting his studies at Oregon State College (University) in Corvallis to serve in World War II, Engelbart went back and earned a bachelor's degree in electrical engineering in 1948. He also received a doctorate in electrical engineering from the University of California, Berkeley in 1955, where he would serve briefly as an acting assistant professor.

Don Estridge(Philip) Don Estridge is a member of the 1997 Industry Hall of Fame inductee class.
As the director of IBM's personal computer project, Estridge is often referred to as the "father of the PC." He joined IBM in 1959, starting out as a junior engineer in the Federal Systems Division, as member of the team building the SAGE air-defense network. In 1980, IBM assigned Estridge to direct its new Entry Systems Division, charged with designing a computer specifically for small business and home use.

To speed the time of development, the three competing teams were required to construct the machine using currently available off-the-shelf parts—a unique concept at the time. Estridge lead the winning group, which studied the designs of each existing microcomputer and incorporated all their best ideas. The device they provided 18 months later was a relatively low-cost unit that, with the IBM brand behind it, legitimized personal computing technologies. The IBM PC model 5150 created the standard, virtually defining a PC as a microcomputer compatible with IBM's systems.

Estridge was named president of the Entry Systems Division in 1983 and promoted to vice president the following year. He received a bachelor's degree in electrical engineering at the University of Florida in 1959. Along with his wife Mary Ann, he died in a plane crash on Aug. 2, 1985.

Judy EstrinJudy Estrin, NCD Estrin and her husband, Bill Carrico wrote the script for high-tech entrepreneurs by launching four Silicon Valley companies—with one acquired by 3Com and another by Cisco Systems. They started by founding Bridge Communications, which entered the router market three years before Cisco, and was purchased by 3Com in 1987. That was followed by Network Computing Devices, which provided UNIX terminals; and Precept Software, an Internet video technology firm. Estrin served as CTO at Cisco after the company acquired Precept, but she left to join Carrico and co-found Packet Design, an Internet infrastructure company. She remains CEO of the company name, which is now known as JLABS, LLC.

Estrin began her network technology career while part of a Stanford research group headed by Vint Cerf, the computer science pioneer who is often referred to as the "Father of the Internet." One of the key accomplishments of his team was its development of the TCP/IP specification, the underlying technology of the Internet. Estrin then joined the Zilog Corporation, where she helped design microprocessors and led the team that developed Z-net, one of the first commercial local area networks (LANs).

She received a bachelor's degree in math and computer science from the University of California, Los Angeles, as well as a master's degree in electrical engineering from Stanford University.

TOP

Bill GatesBill Gates is a member of the 1997 Industry Hall of Fame inductee class.
Gates is one of the best-known entrepreneurs of the personal computer revolution. His business career began in 1970, when he and his friend Paul Allen developed "Traf-o-Data," a computer program that monitored traffic patterns in Seattle, for which they received $20,000. The duo would continue to work on various projects, culminating in their design of a BASIC programming language interpreter; which resulted in a new product and business venture his partner named “Micro-soft." In 1980, the duo purchased an operating system that they revised to become MS-DOS, which lead to their company's meteoric rise.

In mid-1981 Gates and Allen incorporated Microsoft and he was appointed president and chairman of the board. He drove development of the innovative Windows operating system, which launched in 1985 with a mouse-driven graphic interface. The product was a tremendous success for Gates and Microsoft. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bill_Gates - cite_note-7

He stepped down as chief executive officer in 2000, though he remained as chairman and chief software architect. Gates announced a reduction in his role at Microsoft in 2006, dedicating his time to the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. He remains non-executive chairman.

Ge Tech GVU CenterGeorgia Tech's GVU Center is a member of the 2000 Industry Hall of Fame inductee class.
Professors Larry Hodges and Bill Ribarsky created the Georgia Tech Computer Graphics Interest Group, (also known as TechGraph) in 1988 to conduct research in graphics and visualization. It was later merged with the Biomedical Visualization Lab, the Animation Lab and the Video Lab to form the Georgia Tech Imaging Consortium. The name was changed in 1991 to the Graphics, Visualization & Usability Center, or GVU Center. The facility brings together researchers, students and expertise from all six Georgia Tech colleges to solve complex problems and create innovation.

GVU has expanded its mission over the years, now performing academic research in 3D compression, animation, augmented reality, collaborative work, educational technologies, gaming, graphics, human-computer interaction, information visualization, new media, online communities, perception, robotics, ubiquitous computing, virtual reality and wearable computing.

Charles GeschkeCharles Geschke is a member of the 1999 Industry Hall of Fame inductee class.
A respected and inspiring industry leader, Geschke was instrumental in developing some of the software industry's most pioneering technologies. He created and directed the Imaging Sciences Laboratory at Xerox's PARC (Palo Alto Research Center), where researchers studied and experimented in computer science, graphics, image processing, and optics. There he hired his long-term research partner, John Warnock and together they invented the Interpress page description language (PDL), which provided a means to electronically describe complex forms like typeface.

When Xerox declined to develop the technology for commercial use, the two left the company to co-found Adobe Systems. Through Geschke's vision and passion, the idea formed the foundation of what would become one of the world's largest software companies. He retired as president on Adobe in 2000, though he remains co-chairman of the board of directors and continues to shape the company's direction.

Geschke earned a doctorate in computer science from Carnegie-Mellon University as well as a master's degree in mathematics and a bachelor's degree in classics from Xavier University.

Jack GoekenJack Goeken is a member of the 2000 Industry Hall of Fame inductee class.
Known as a prolific entrepreneur, Goeken founded a number of communications-related organizations during his lifetime, including Microwave Communications, Inc. (MCI) Airfone and FTD Mercury Network. His first major venture evolved from a plan to increase sales at his two-way radio business in Illinois, which involved the placement of microwave towers between Chicago and St. Louis to sell more two-way radios to truckers. But AT&T and a few other communications companies filed petitions with the Federal Communications Commission to stop him. His partners dropped out as the legal expenses climbed, leaving Goeken to continue the fight on his own. The risk finally paid off as AT&T lost its monopoly and MCI was able to expand into a national network.

After leaving MCI, Goeken adapted an electronic wire service to process floral deliveries, which lead to his founding of FTD. A few years later, he pioneered the technology required for in-flight telephone service and established Airfone to get it implemented in all the major airlines. Goeken continued his entrepreneurial expansion by founding In-Flight Phone Corporation, Railfone, and CML Communications. He died September 10, 2010.

Jacob GoldmanJacob Goldman, Xerox's chief scientist, was instrumental in founding the company's distinguished Palo Alto Research Center (PARC), which cultivated a number of the industry's most celebrated innovators and inventions.

 

 

Dr. James (Jim) GoodnightDr. James (Jim) Goodnight is a member of the 2005 Industry Hall of Fame inductee class.
Since becoming CEO of SAS in 1976, James Goodnight has overseen an unbroken chain of revenue growth. That's a rare occurrence in the IT industry, especially for an organization that sells business analytics software that Goodnight and his colleagues at North Carolina State University originally designed to analyze agricultural-research data.

Over the next 30 years, the SAS Institute became one of the largest privately-held corporations in North Carolina with its software used to conduct statistical analysis in clinical pharmaceutical trials and within the insurance and public health fields. Goodnight's team also developed solutions for data mining, data warehousing, sustainability and business performance management.

He is a solid North Carolina State University alumni, receiving his bachelor's, master's and doctorate degrees in statistics. Goodnight was also a faculty member of the university from 1972 to 1976.

Andrew GroveAndrew Grove is a member of the 1997 Industry Hall of Fame inductee class.
After five years as a member of the research team at Fairfield Semiconductor, Grove left the company with his colleagues Robert Noyce and Gordon Moore to co-found Intel. During the first several years of operation, he served as the company's Chief Operating Office and would help the organization secure its long-term leadership position in the PC market. He played a significant part in the negotiations with IBM that resulted in the exclusive use of Intel microprocessors in its personal computer lines throughout the 1980's. That arrangement secured Intel's future, with a thriving revenue stream and distribution network.

Grove was named Chief Executive Officer in 1987 and became Chairman of the board a decade later. During his tenure, Grove helped transform Intel from a small chip manufacturer to the world's 7th largest company. In 1998 he stepped down as CEO and retired from the Chairman position in 2005.

He earned a bachelor's degree in chemical engineering from the City College of New York in 1960, and earned a Ph.D. in chemical engineering from the University of California, Berkeley in 1963.

TOP

Jeff HawkinsJeff Hawkins is a member of the 1999 Industry Hall of Fame inductee class.
By combining his fascination with technology and a passion for biophysics, Hawkins created several opportunities to improve the lives of others. He not only helped establish familiar corporations such as Palm Computing and Handspring, but he designed a number of innovative products and improvements that we use every day. His accomplishments include the development of Rapid Application Development (RAD) software and advances in pen-based computing that lead to the creation of one of the first tablet computers. Both designs took place when he worked at GRiD, which was acquired by Tandy in 1988. The company helped Hawkins get a new venture company off the ground in 1992, Palm Computing. Their first product offering was the Zoomer, a PDA that failed to gain a market. But when the company was acquired by U.S. Robotics, Hawkins' team had the resources to design and produce the successful Palm Pilot.

When 3Com assumed ownership of U.S. Robotics, he and Palm co-founders Donna Dubinsky and Ed Colligan left to found Handspring in 1998. After 3Com spun off Palm, the two companies merged (to be absorbed by HP in 2010). Hawkins continued mixing physiology and business in 2005, when he co-founded Numenta to develop a new approach to machine intelligence.

He attended Cornell University, where he earned a bachelor's degree in electrical engineering in 1979.

Dennis Hayes is a member of the 2003 Industry Hall of Fame inductee class.
Hayes never allowed the deterioration of his eyesight to restrict his dreams. From his basement, he created the standard AT command set, a software string that let any computer with a serial port activate features on an intelligent modem. In June 1981, Hayes introduced the Smartmodem and launched D.C. Hayes & Associates, which would grow to a 1,500-employee organization operating in 44 countries at its pinnacle. The company, renamed Hayes Microproducts experienced a number of financial challenges over the years, many related to production issues and a backlog of orders. In 1998, the business ceased operations.

Hayes also founded the Association for Online Professionals (AOP), which become the USIIA (US Internet Industry Association) in 1994. The organization advocates public policy for Internet commerce, content and connectivity, and provides essential business news to its members. Hayes divides his time between his role as chair of the USIIA and his duties at Virtual Resources LLC, a support organization for high-tech security startups that he founded.

Hayes is an alumnus of Georgia Institute of Technology

William HewlettWilliam Hewlett is a member of the 1997 Industry Hall of Fame inductee class.
In 1939, Packard and Bill Hewlett started HP (Hewlett-Packard) with just $538 and an idea. The duo designed and built their first offering in Packard's garage, selling the sound oscillator to the Walt Disney Studios. To support the war effort, the company quickly expanded its facilities and products, which included aviation and nautical instruments, radios, radar, and sonar devices. After incorporating in 1947, Hewlett was named vice president of HP. He was elected executive vice president in 1957, president in 1964, and also was named chief executive officer in 1969.

Hewlett served as chairman of HP's executive committee until 1983, when he became vice chairman of the HP board of directors. In 1987, he was named director emeritus and he served in that position until his death on Jan. 12, 2001. He was actively involved at HP except during World War II, when Hewlett was on the staff of the Army's Chief Signal Officer and then headed the electronics section of the New Development Division of the War Department Special Staff. During this latter tour of duty, he was on a special U.S. team that inspected Japanese industry immediately after the war. From 1950 to 1957 he was on the board of directors of the Institute of Radio Engineers -- now the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) -- and served as president of the institute in 1954. He also has played an important role in the development of the former Western Electronic Manufacturers Association, now called the American Electronics Association.

Hewlett received a B.A. degree from Stanford University in 1934 and a master's degree in electrical engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in 1936. He also earned a degree in engineering from Stanford University in 1939.

David HitzDavid Hitz is a member of the 2006 Industry Hall of Fame inductee class.
As executive vice president of NetApp, David Hitz is responsible for the organization's future strategy and direction. He and fellow company co-founder James Lau started shared a desire to simplify data storage, believing that the current systems were too complex for most businesses. So they established NetApp and designed the appliances that would meet their technology goals, and then developed a channel program to deliver them.

Prior to NetApp, he was a senior engineer at Auspex Corporation, an enterprise storage solutions provider, where he was responsible for file systems and microkernel design. He also held engineering positions at MIPS Computer, focusing on file system and I/O subsystem design for the System V kernel development effort.

Prior to launching a career in technology, Hitz was a genuine cowboy. He shares analogies and experiences from managing cattle in many of his business discussions, including his autobiography, "How to Castrate a Bull, Unexpected Lessons on Risk, Growth, and Success in Business." Hitz graduated with a bachelor's degree in computer science and electrical engineering from Princeton University.

Grace HopperGrace Hopper is a member of the 2001 Industry Hall of Fame inductee class.
A true computer pioneer, Hopper spent a half century helping keep America on the leading edge of high technology through her research and service to the country. She invented the compiler and, in the process, spawned the universal programming language COBOL and modern programming. After joining the military at the outset of World War II, she found out her age and mathematics skills would prevent a field assignment. While that roadblock changed her plans, Hopper was commissioned a Lieutenant and assigned to Cruft Laboratories at Harvard University, where she was introduced to the Mark I computer. Writing binary code for these systems was time-consuming and prone to error, which would drive her to develop the first computer "compiler" in 1952. Hopper's creation simplified computer programming, significantly reducing the time and errors in the process.

At the time of her invention, Hopper was a Systems Engineer and Director of Automatic Programming Development of the UNIVAC Division at the Eckert-Mauchly Computer Corporation. Her next project involved producing specifications for a common business language, which lead to the foundation of COBOL (Common Business-Oriented Language), which was published in 1959. She was a consultant and lecturer for the United States Naval Reserve up to her retirement in December 1966, but was recalled to active duty in 1967. After spending more than 40 years in the U.S. Navy and achieving the rank of Rear Admiral, Lower Half, Hopper retired from duty in 1986 as the nation's oldest active officer.

Hopper received a bachelor's degree in mathematics and physics from Vassar College in 1928 and continued her studies in mathematics at Yale University, earning an MA in 1930 and a PhD in 1934. She passed away on January 1, 1992.

Robert (Bob) Huang is a member of the 2004 Industry Hall of Fame inductee class.
After founding the SYNNEX Corporation in 1980, Huang spent the next 28 years cultivating a culture of success and growth. When he retired from his role as president and Co-Chief Executive Officer in 2008, the IT distributor employed more than 7,000 people worldwide with more than $7 billion in annual sales. He spent then following two years as chairman of the SYNNEX board of directors, retiring from that post in June of 2010.

With an investment from Mitac, Huang ushered SYNNEX into the contract manufacturing business, assembling systems for Compaq, Sun Microsystems and Dell. While Mitac acquired that part of the organization in 2008, it contributed significantly to the distributor's cash flow and revenue. Huang continued to grow the company with the acquisitions of Merisel's ComputerLand division, Gates/Arrow Distributing, and EMJ Data Systems.

He earned a bachelor's degree in electrical engineering degree from Kyushyu University in Japan and master's degrees on electrical engineering and statistics from the University of Rochester. Huang also received a master's degree from the Sloan School of Management at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT).

TOP

Joseph Inatome is a member of the 1999 Industry Hall of Fame inductee class.
Along with his son Rick, the Intaomes helped define and emphasize the importance of the reseller channel. They were pioneers of the franchising model, which helped aggregate a number of individual storefronts into a national network of corporate resellers. Together, they leveraged their vendor partners to create a nation-wide chain, including both company-owned and franchised operations.

After seeing the Altair 8800 computer kit in a magazine ad, he bought one and had his son assemble it. Inatome managed his own engineering firm at that time and several of his employees wanted one for themselves, so he had Rick put those systems together, too. Upon his son's graduation from Michigan State University in 1976, the two formed Computer Mart Inc., selling $1 million in computer equipment in its first year and $5 million the next. When one of their employees wanted to move, Rick created a one-page franchising agreement and began to expansion. The name changed to Inacomp Computer Centers in the early 1980s. Inacomp Computer Centers merged with ValCom Inc. in 1991 and became Inacom Corp., with more than $7 billion in sales and more than 5,600 employees.

Joe Inatome received a B.S. in engineering from Wayne State University and was Honorably Discharged from the U.S. Army, having served as a member of Military Intelligence during WW II. He died June 6, 2009.

Rick InatomeRick Inatome is a member of the 1999 Industry Hall of Fame inductee class.
Along with his father Joe, the Intaomes helped define and emphasize the importance of the reseller channel. Rick was also one of the founding fathers of the franchising model, which helped aggregate a number of individual storefronts into a national network of corporate resellers. Together, they leveraged their vendor partners to create a nation-wide chain, including both company-owned and franchised operations.

After seeing the Altair 8800 computer kit in a magazine ad, the elder Inatome bought one and had his son assemble it. The head of his own engineering firm, several of his father‘s employees wanted one themselves, so he put those systems together, too. After graduating from Michigan State University in 1976, Rick had the choice of becoming a broker or building a PC business for his father. The market lost out when the two formed Computer Mart Inc., selling $1 million in computer equipment in its first year and $5 million the next. When one of their employees wanted to move, Rick created a one-page franchising agreement and began to expansion. The name changed to Inacomp Computer Centers in the early 1980s. Inacomp Computer Centers merged with ValCom Inc. in 1991 and became Inacom Corp., with more than $7 billion in sales and more than 5,600 employees. When the company liquidated in 2003, Inatome went on to invested in or co-found more than 30 different companies.

Erskine Bronson Ingram is a member of the 1998 Industry Hall of Fame inductee class.
Through a series of acquisitions and successful execution of a comprehensive business plan, Bronson Ingram created one of the largest computer distributors in the world. In 1985, as Chairman of the family business Ingram Industries, he purchased Software Distribution Services, Micro D, and Softeam to create the foundation of today's distribution business. Those individual operations merged in 1989 and renamed Ingram Micro D, with the “D" dropped in 1996 as the company was spun off and taken public.

Bronsom IngramBronson Ingram founded Ingram Industries, Inc. in 1978, when he and his brother divided the wide-ranging family-controlled operations. The new organization eventually contained 54 separate units, encompassing a portfolio that varied from a barge business and petroleum refineries to a book distribution company, which was soon complemented by the software and computer divisions. In 1991, Bronson and his executive team identified the global market opportunities for computer distribution and began to expand its operations with the opening of a new facility in the United Kingdom.

Ingram attended Vanderbilt University and graduated in 1953 from Princeton, after which he served two years as a lieutenant in the Navy. Bronson Ingram died on June 15, 1995.

Intel 386The Intel 386SX was inducted in the Industry Hall of Fame in 1998.
Introduced in 1985, the Intel 386 microprocessor was a 32-bit chip that could run multiple programs at the same time. Since the company's original 80386 was cost prohibitive for many manufacturers and users, inn 1988 they added the smaller version 386SX to meet the needs of the emerging personal computer market. Although it used 16-bit data bus instead of the 32 bit, which somewhat compromised its processing speed, it used less power. That made the 386SX suitable for entry-level PCs, offering a simple design for computer manufacturers to include in their machines.

TOP

Steve JobsSteve Jobs is a member of the 1997 Industry Hall of Fame inductee class.
Jobs is renowned for his ingenuity and entrepreneurial spirit, perhaps best known for his role as co-founder and CEO of Apple Computer. But he helped other organizations reach their pinnacle as well, including NeXT and Pixar Animation Studios. Jobs first enterprise began in the late 1970's, when he collaborated with his friend Steve Wozniak to design and market the Apple II, the first commercially successful line of personal computers. The team developed a number of other innovative devices, including the MacIntosh, before departing the company in 1985.

After Jobs resigned from Apple, he started another computer manufacturing business, which he named NeXT. The company built technologically advanced systems targeted at the financial, scientific, and academic community. In 1986, Jobs bought The Graphics Group from Lucasfilms and created Pixar Animation Studios, which developed high-end graphics hardware. When selling the equipment proved unprofitable, Jobs contracted with Disney to produce a number of computer-animated feature films. In 2006, he sold the company to Disney. In 1996, Apple's acquisition of NeXT brought Jobs back to the company he founded, which was now in a difficult financial situation. After assuming the role of CEO in 1997, he went on to reinvigorate the research and development team and become the company's face of innovation. Under his direction, Apple rolled out the technology that still defines the organization today.

Jobs died on October 5, 2011.

Bill JoyBill Joy is a member of the 1999 Industry Hall of Fame inductee class.
Joy served as chief scientist at Sun Microsystems until 2003, serving as key designer of systems including Solaris, SPARC, chip architectures and pipelines, and Java. In 1982, he co-founded the company with Vinod Khosla, Scott McNealy and Andy Bechtolsheim. With more than 40 patents in his name, Joy continued his creative projects after leaving the company.

His technological prowess started many years before he started Sun. As a graduate student at the University of California, Berkeley, he was largely responsible for developing the first open source operating system with built-in computer network protocols. The resulting BSD (Berkeley Software Distribution) UNIX program is considered the backbone of the Internet. Joy was also the original author of the vi text editor, which was release in 1978 with the UNIX release.

Joy received a Bachelor of Science in electrical engineering from the University of Michigan and a Master of Science in electrical engineering and computer science from the University of California, Berkeley.

TOP

Phillippe KahnPhilippe Kahn is a member of the 1999 Industry Hall of Fame inductee class.
Kahn is is credited with creating the first camera phone solution, allowing pictures to be shared instantly on public networks. He is considered both a technology innovator and entrepreneur, who went on to found four successful technology companies. Kahn first co-founded Borland in 1982 and without any venture capital, his team grew their operations to more than $500 million in revenue. He served as CEO of the Microsoft rival until his departure in 1994. Kahn collaborated with Sonia Lee to create Starfish Software later than year, developing much of the core IP required for device synchronization, which is used primarily in the wireless industry. That business was acquired by Motorola in 1998 and, with Kahn's creation of the camera phone solution, the couple moved on to found LightSurf.

Their technology powered the wireless products of Sprint, Verizon and the other leading carriers. As the management team prepared for an IPO in 2005, VeriSign stepped in and acquired the company. Kahn and Lee had already started their next venture, Fullpower, and focused their attention on completing development of its mobile sensing technology platform.

Kahn received a degree in mathematics at ETH Zurich (Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Zurich) in Switzerland. He also earned a master's degree in mathematics from the University of Nice, in France and majored in musicology and classical flute at the Zurich Music Conservatory in Switzerland.

Mitch KaporMitchell (Mitch) Kapor is a member of the 1997 Industry Hall of Fame inductee class.
Kapor is an entrepreneur and pioneer in computer and Internet technologies. After founding Lotus Development Corp. in 1982, he went on to design the Lotus 1-2-3 software with Jonathan Sachs. Kapor served as company president, Chief Executive Officer and chairman of the board until 1986, and continued as a director for another year. In 1983, he took the company public and grew the organization to more than 1300 employees before his departure.

In 1990, Kapor joined John Perry Barlow and John Gilmore in founding the Electronic Frontier Foundation, and served as its chairman until 1994. The non-profit organization works to protect privacy, free expression, and access to public resources and information online. In 2003 he became the founding Chair of the Mozilla Foundation, which is dedicated to the development and promulgation of standards-compliant open source web browser software (Firefox). Kapor is also the founding investor and Chair of Linden Research.

He received a B.A. degree from Yale College in 1971 and studied psychology, linguistics, and computer science as part of an interdisciplinary major in Cybernetics.

Phil KatzPhil Katz founded PKWARE Inc. in 1986 and was the author of the world-renowned PKZIP/UNZIP programs for data compression. His contributions to the computer industry were many, including work with Bulletin Board Systems and many computer user groups and support forums. His decision to dedicate the .ZIP extension and file format specification to the public domain helped the .ZIP file format become a globally open standard. A graduate of the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee's Computer Science Engineering program, Katz passed away April 14, 2000.

Alan Kay is a member of the 2006 Industry Hall of Fame inductee class.
Dr. Alan Kay is a distinguished visionary and pivotal researcher in modern computer. At Xerox's Palo Alto Research Center (PARC) in the 1970s, he designed Smalltalk, the first object-oriented programming language, and helped create the prototype PC (Alto). These inventions were later commercialized by Apple in its Lisa and Macintosh computers. Kay is also a GUI (graphical user interface) pioneer, credited as a key member of the University of Utah ARPA research team that designed the precursor to the Internet, ARPANet.

After a decade of development at Xerox PARC, he became the chief scientist at Atari, where he remained for three years. In 1984, Kay became a Fellow at Apple Computer, Inc., a few select scientists who were given autonomy to pursue creative ideas the company could implement in future offerings. While serving in that capacity, he collaborated with others to develop Squeak, an open source version of Smalltalk.

Dr. Kay holds M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in electrical engineering (computer sciences) from the University of Utah. His Ph.D. was awarded for the development of the first graphical object-oriented personal computer. He earned undergraduate degrees in mathematics and molecular biology from the University of Colorado. Kay is a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the National Academy of Engineering, and the Royal Society of Arts. He founded and remains president of the Viewpoints Research Institute, a non-profit organization dedicated to children, learning, and advanced software development. Kay is also an Adjunct Professor of Computer Science at the University of California, Los Angeles.

Michael KrasnyMichael Krasny is a member of the 2002 Industry Hall of Fame inductee class.
The founder of Computer Discount Warehouse (CDW) started selling used computers from classified ads placed in the Chicago Tribune. That act proved so successful that Krasny created MPK Computers, changing the name a year later to Computer Discount Warehouse. The company went public in 1993, fueling additional expansion that made CDW one of the world's most successful IT companies, a hybrid that joins both distribution and solution provider business models.

Krasny lead the company as chief executive officer for almost 20 years, retiring in 2001. He learned that inventory control was the secret to success, and his biggest contributions to CDW were the efficiencies he introduced throughout the organization. Krasny created logarithms that measured product sales and demand, and created computer databases of product and customer information to improve results.

Krasny received a bachelor's degree in finance from University of Illinois-Urbana-Champaign in 1975.

Ray KurzweilRay Kurzweil is a member of the 2005 Industry Hall of Fame inductee class.
Kurzweil is one of the leading inventors of our time, with a hand in developing a number of technologies that have positively impacted the quality of life and livelihood of people throughout the world. Among his creations are CCD flat-bed scanners, omni-font optical character recognition, print-to-speech reading machines for the blind, text-to-speech synthesizers and the first music synthesizer capable of replicating the sounds of orchestral instruments. Kurzweil Computer Products was the first company to market with a commercial version of an optical character recognition program.

Kurzweil is often honored, receiving the MIT-Lemelson Prize (world's largest for innovation), the National Medal of Technology from President Clinton, nineteen honorary doctorate degrees and honors from three other U. S. presidents. He was also inducted into the National Inventors, Hall of Fame, which was established by the U.S. Patent Office.

Kurzweil graduated from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) with a Bachelor's degree in Computer Science and Literature in 1970.

TOP

Mike Lazaridis Mike Lazaridis is a member of the 2005 Industry Hall of Fame inductee class.
Known in the global wireless community as a visionary, innovator, and engineer of extraordinary talent, Lazaridis traces his passion to a supportive family and school environment. He serves as president and co-CEO of Research In Motion (RIM), where he is also responsible for the company's product strategy, research and development, and manufacturing operations. While he manages a number of executive duties, the organization's co-founder is a scientist at heart, holding more than thirty patents for his innovations in wireless radio technology and software, including the Blackberry.

Lazaridis is also passionate about community involvement, and an enthusiastic advocate for education and scientific research. Among his contributions is a $100 million donation to the University of Waterloo to establish an Institute for Quantum Computing and a $150 million investment in the Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics (PI), helping each attain higher levels of scientific study.

Lazaridis holds honorary doctoral degrees from the University of Waterloo (Engineering), McMaster University, University of Windsor and Université Laval. He received The Ernest C. Manning Principal Award (a significant Canadian innovation honor) and was named both a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada and an Officer of the Order of Canada.

Linwood A. (Chip) Lacy, Jr. is a member of the 1997 Industry Hall of Fame inductee class.
Lacy was a creative force in the founding of Ingram Micro and has been influential in the development of a number of other businesses over his career. He came to Ingram Industries via the 1989 acquisition of Micro D, where he served as chairman and CEO, then worked closely with Bronson Ingram to grow the company's computer distribution division. Lacy eventually held the title of CEO at both the parent company (Ingram Industries) and computer business unit. He spearheaded Ingram Micro's skyrocketing growth from $100 million to $12 billion in revenues as chief executive of the company, before leaving his role as CEO in 1996 (though he remained on the Ingram Industries board).

Lacy served as president and Chief Executive Officer of Micro Warehouse Incorporated from 1996 to 1997 and also sat on the board of directors for EarthLink Network, EVault, Confidex, and NETGEAR. Since 2008, he has been an operating partner at the private equity firm Council Ventures.

Lacy received a B.S. degree in Chemical Engineering from the University of Virginia and an M.B.A. in Business from the Darden Graduate School of Business Administration at the University of Virginia.

Lotus 1-2-3 was inducted in the Industry Hall of Fame in 1998.
The original Lotus 1-2-3 spreadsheet software program was designed by Jonathan Sachs and introduced by the Lotus Development Corporation on January 26, 1983. Unlike some of its predecessors, the application was fast and developed relatively few errors during use. Lotus 1-2-3 was written for the IBM PC, using language that allowed it to be used with numerous computers that were built to the same standard. The software was often used to test the general application compatibility of these clone machines. Along with its ease of use, that feature helped Lotus 1-2-3 remain popular until overtaken by sales of Microsoft's Excel program in 1988.

TOP

drew majorDrew Major is a member of the 1999 Industry Hall of Fame inductee class.
As a serial developer and entrepreneur, Major has left his mark on a number of networking companies over his career. He was a co-founder of Novell and served as the company's lead architect and developer. In 1981 Major and his partners saw the value in enabling PCs to share files and other resources via local area networks (LAN), which lead them to create Netware. By 1991 that system was instrumental in the extraordinary growth in computer and network deployments. As Novell's chief scientist and vice president of advanced development, Major had enormous influence over the company's strategy and product direction.

He remained a creative force within Novell until 2002, when he co-founded Arroyo Video Solutions with Paul Sherer. The on-demand video technology provider was purchased four years later by Cisco Systems and Major was named a Cisco Systems Fellow and continued to focus on internet content and services delivery.

Major received a Bachelor of Science degree with honors in mathematics and computer science from Brigham Young University in 1980.

Jim ManziJim Manzi is a member of the 2003 Industry Hall of Fame inductee class.
After he became acquainted with Lotus Development as a consultant for McKinsey in 1982, Manzi transitioned his role to company employee just three months later. His ascension within the ranks of the company was just as fast as he was named president in 1984, followed by Chairman and CEO in 1996. Manzi is credited for steering the company away from its traditional desktop applications towards more collaborative software. Lotus Notes was an example of this workgroup computing software, a distinct departure from its most successful programs, Lotus 1-2-3 and Lotus Symphony.

IBM acquired Lotus in 1995 after a series of rather difficult negotiations, leading Manzi to resign later that year after the transaction was complete. He then founded investment firm Stonegate Capital, and has been involved in the creation and development of a number of technology start-up ventures.

Manzi received a bachelor's degree in the classics from Colgate University in 1973, and later received a master's degree in international relations from the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy at Tufts University.

Massachusetts Institute of Technology: Laboratory for Computer Science is a member of the 1999 Industry Hall of Fame inductee class.
The Massachusetts Institute of Technology's Laboratory for Computer Science (LCS) was first created in 1963 as Project MAC (Machine-Aided Cognition), a project within the Department of Electrical Engineering. The original director of the team was Robert Fano, who intended to develop a new computer system that could be accessed by a large number of people, yet responsive to individual needs. The original focus of MAC/LCS was to create and perfect a computer time-sharing system, which was funded by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA). Their accomplishments would not end there, with the team helping to develop the first local area network and E-mail system, chat rooms and a fundamental word-processing program. The MITS LCS has made significant advances in computer security and online privacy and, in collaboration with Bell Labs, created the Multiplexed Information and Computing Service (MULTICS), a predecessor to UNIX.

In 1967 Project MAC was separated from the Department of Electrical Engineering and became an interdepartmental laboratory, and renamed the Laboratory for Computer Science in 1976. The group was merged in 2003 with the Artificial Intelligence Laboratory to form the MIT Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL). More than 65 companies and groups have been created by current or former members of the research group, including 3Com, Lotus Development Corp. and RSA Security. CSAIL is also the home of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C), which is directed by the acknowledged inventor of the Internet, Tim Berners-Lee.

jeff_mckeeverJeff McKeever is a member of the 1997 Industry Hall of Fame inductee class.
His first foray into computer retail was in 1976, with a single store where McKeever sold Apple II, Northstar, IMSAI and Altair computers. The experience he gained from that operation helped him form one of the most well-known technology franchises in history, including more than 1000 franchises throughout the world. MicroAge would thrive under McKeever's direction, with more than $6 billion in revenue and employing more than 6,000 people at its peak.

Though the company filed for bankruptcy in 2001 and liquidated its assets, McKeever revised the name when he organized Frontier Technology LLC the following year. While much of the MicroAge heritage was left behind, including its distribution business and enterprise focus, the IT reseller continues to provide and support a wide range of clients throughout the country.

McKeever received an M.B.A. and a B.S. in Accounting from the University of Arizona and graduated from the Pacific Coast Banking School at the University of Washington.

robert metcalfBob (Robert) Metcalfe is a member of the 2003 Industry Hall of Fame inductee class.
Often referred to as the creator of the Ethernet, Metcalfe was the co-founder of 3Com and continues to promote advances in computer and network technologies. While he often disputes the date he devised the Ethernet standard (either in a 1973 memo or in a 1976 paper), he acknowledges that the true development occurred gradually over several years. When he and his assistant David Boggs published the paper, “Ethernet: Distributed Packet-Switching for Local Computer Networks," it was considered a decisive point in networking history. The patent filed by Xerox lists Metcalfe, David Boggs, Chuck Thacker and Butler Lampson as collaborators on the Ethernet, since their team developed the concept at its Palo Alto Research Center (PARC).

Metcalfe departed the research program in 1979 to co-found 3Com with Gregory Shaw, which started out as a network consulting company. In 1984, after designing the critical product portfolio, they took the company public. 3Com would grow to become a force in network technologies, eventually merging with U.S. Robotics Corporation before being acquired by HP in 2008. Metcalfe left the organization in 1990 and is now a General Partner at Polaris Venture Partners.

He graduated Massachusetts Institute of Technology with bachelor's degrees in Electrical Engineering and Industrial Management in 1969, and earned a master's degree in applied mathematics from Harvard in 1970.

Microsoft WindowsMicrosoft Windows was inducted in the Industry Hall of Fame in 1998.
Windows is the first commercially successful operating system using a graphical user interface (GUI). When Version 1.0 was released on November 20, 1985, it contained a control panel, basic word processor, notepad, clock, painting program, appointment calendar, card filer, clipboard, computer terminal, RAM driver and several other applications. Microsoft Windows was designed specifically to run on IBM PCs and compatible computers, likely a major contributor to its initial and long-term success.

William (Bill) Millard is a member of the 1997 Industry Hall of Fame inductee class.
Millard was founder of IMS (Information Management Science) Associates, a computer manufacturer and parent company of the electronics retailer, ComputerLand. He began his business career in 1972, providing computer consulting and engineering support from his home office. The following year, Millard founded IMS Associates, Inc, adding advanced engineering and software management to the services portfolio, supporting business and federal government mainframe users.

In 1975, the company designed and started shipping it IMSAI 8080 microcomputer, and Millard expanded quickly to offer printers, terminals, floppy diskettes and software. The following year, he partnered with John Martin-Musumeci to start a new computer reseller franchise, ComputerLand. Intended to increase the IMSAI sales with a greater geographic reach and increased product exposure, the venture exceeded more than $1 billion in revenue and over 800 franchised outlets within several years. In 1987, IMS folded due to legal issues originating from the company's financing and Millard left the industry.

MIT Media LabThe MIT Media Laboratory is a member of the 2000 Industry Hall of Fame inductee class.
Founded in 1985 by Massachusetts Institute of Technology professor Nicholas Negroponte and former university president Jerome Wiesner, the Media Lab has been actively involved in advancing a number of emerging technologies. Its researchers, engineers and scientists conduct research and development covering a variety of technologies, ranging from cognition and learning to electronic music and holography. Innovations resulting from work at the MIT Lab include wireless mesh networks, electronic ink technologies (digital books), the XO Laptop (One Laptop per Child), and a number of educational and medical technologies.

The MIT Lab is a consortium, supported by more than 70 corporate sponsors representing a myriad of industries. Many of the technologies and applications are tested and refined through experiments at MIT and in the field, in cooperation with the supporting organizations. The concepts and development work conducted at the MIT Lab have lead to the creation of more than 80 spin-off companies over the years.

Frank Mogavero Frank Mogavero is a member of the 2005 Industry Hall of Fame inductee class.
A debilitating illness set Mogavero on the path to entrepreneurship, spurring him to create what would eventually become Data Systems Worldwide (DSW) in 1971 with his life savings of $300. Initially a reseller of used accounting machines, he built one of the most respected solution provider organizations in the world by adapting to the needs of business customers. Mogavero mastered the transition process, moving from a focus on accounting equipment to providing datacenter services, eventually opening a line of retail stores to sell and service PCs. Those changes continued in 1989 when he consolidated the DSW retail operations and re-focused the company's resources to support business networking solutions and consulting services.

As one of the founders of the AMDA (Accounting Machine Dealers of America, renamed Association of Minicomputer Dealers later) Mogavero played an instrumental part in developing the industry's first "Blue Book." He was also a founding member of APC Open, an organization of UNIX resellers.

Mogavero graduated with an Associate's degree from Los Angeles City College and received a Bachelor's degree in Marketing and Accounting from UCLA in 1957.

Gordon Moore is a member of the 2000 Industry Hall of Fame inductee class.
Moore co-founded Intel in 1968 with Bob Noyce and served initially as the company's Executive Vice President. In 1975, he became President and Chief Executive Officer and in 1979 he was elected Chairman as well. Moore remained CEO until 1987 and was named Chairman Emeritus in 1997. Prior to Intel, he worked at Fairchild Semiconductor following his departure from Shockley Semiconductor Laboratory.

He is perhaps best known in the industry for "Moore's Law." In 1968 he predicted that the number of transistors that could be affordably placed on a computer chip would double every year. Moore updated his prediction in 1975, reducing the frequency to every two years. His "law" has become a guide for the industry to follow, encouraging producers to deliver increasingly more powerful semiconductor chips in a cost-effective manner.

Moore earned a BS degree in Chemistry from the University of California at Berkeley and a Ph.D. in Chemistry and Physics from the California Institute of Technology.

Nathan Morton is a member of the 2006 Industry Hall of Fame inductee class.
Best known as a pioneer of the "big box" retail method, Morton helped build CompUSA into the nation's first computer superstore. After leading regional and national expansions for other retailers including Target and The Home Depot, he brought that same expertise to the technology arena.

In just five years, Morton took the company (known then as SoftWarehouse) from two stores and $60 million in sales to a multibillion-dollar national retailer. In addition to the name change, under his guidance CompUSA completed an initial public offering on the New York Stock Exchange in December of 1991. At the time, most computer stores were independently owned or part of national franchises such as MicroAge or ComputerLand, so Morton's capital-intensive growth strategy was a significant departure from the norm.

After stepping down from CompUSA in 1993, he went on to lead several other organizations, including president and CEO of Open Environment, CEO of Buildnet and chairman of StarPower Home Entertainment. Morton was a graduate of the University of New York at Buffalo and was actively involved in CompTIA, serving as the association's chairman for two-terms. He passed away November 30, 2005.

Anne Mulcahy is a member of the 2007 Industry Hall of Fame inductee class.
She began her Xerox career in 1976 as a field sales representative, working her way up through HR, operations and other management positions until 2001, when she was appointed CEO. At that time, the company was heavily in debt (over $17 billion) and required a major restructuring to stave off bankruptcy. Mulcahy built a new leadership team, cut 30 percent of the least-profitable lines of business and refocused the company on higher-growth operations. She reestablished Xerox's leadership in the print industry with new products and programs, inspiring new partnerships and a stronger channel focus.

Mulcahy retired from the CEO post effective July 1, 2009 and from the chairman position on May 20, 2010. She was one of the few female executives within the Fortune 500 and held a number of leadership positions at Xerox over the years, including president and chief operating officer, president of General Markets Operations, Vice President of Human Resources, Senior Vice President and Chief Staff Officer and Vice President and Staff Officer for Customer Operations.

Mulcahy graduated with a degree in English/journalism from Marymount College in Tarrytown, N.Y. In addition to the Xerox board, she is a board director of Catalyst, Citigroup Inc., Fuji Xerox Company, Ltd., Target Corporation, The Washington Post Company, and is the chairman of the corporate governance task force of the Business Roundtable.

TOP

Atsutoshi Nishida is a member of the 2005 Industry Hall of Fame inductee class.
Charged with helping Toshiba re-enter the U.S. PC market in 1983 after previous attempts had failed, Atsutoshi Nishida and his team dissected earlier mistakes and researched what consumers wanted. That work led them to develop a computer with a clamshell case, an LCD and IBM-compatibility features. The T1100 was hailed as the first commercially viable laptop, measuring approximately twelve inches square, 2.5 inches thick and weighing just over 9 pounds. Toshiba's first notebook computer was a milestone, spurring what has become a multi-billion-dollar industry in mobile technologies.

Nishida served as Chief Executive Officer of Toshiba from 2005 to 2009, when he was appointed chairman of the board. During his tenure as CEO, he made several significant investments, including the purchase of majority interest in Westinghouse and Fujitsu's hard drive business, in addition to major increases in its memory chip production capabilities.

Nishida graduated with an Undergraduate degree in Political Science and Economics from Waseda University and a Master's degree in Law and Politics from the Graduate School for Law and Politics at the University of Tokyo.

Ray Noorda is a member of the 1997 Industry Hall of Fame inductee class.
Noorda bought a majority stake in Novell Data Systems in 1982 when the company was in bankruptcy with just 17 employees, and built it to into one of the industry's largest organizations. Under his leadership, Novell Inc. employed almost 12,000 workers and competed head to head with Microsoft. Noorda was the chief executive of the company from 1983 to 1995, as it became the dominant player in computer networking. He was responsible for pulling together the SuperSet Team, a group of developers that devised NetWare; a system that permitted file sharing between IBM-compatible personal computers.

Noorda later purchased the WordPerfect and Quattro Pro spreadsheet technology from Borland International to build a business portfolio that was competitive with other manufacturers. He left Novell on 1995 and started the Canopy Group, which acquired a number of assets other companies, including UNIX and Digital Research. Due to failing health, he stepped away from day-to-day duties in 1998 and he died on October 9th, 2006.

Noorda was a graduate of the University of Utah and received a bachelor's degree in engineering in 1949.

Robert Noyce is a member of the 2001 Industry Hall of Fame inductee class.
Known affectionately as the "Mayor of Silicon Valley," Noyce was instrumental in making it the technology epicenter of the world by developing what would eventually become the microchip. He was not only a brilliant scientist and inventor, but founded two companies that figure prominently in the computer industry—Fairchild Semiconductor and Intel.

Noyce was one of the "Traitorous Eight" who left Shockley Semiconductor Laboratory in 1957 to form Fairchild Semiconductor, and the group chose him as its leader. It was there, as general manager, that he invented the integrated chip (silicon with many transistors etched into it at once), patenting the planar process on July 30, 1959. In 1968, Noyce and Gordon Moore left to found Intel, where he oversaw Ted Hoff's invention of the microprocessor. He learned a lesson from his earlier career, giving energetic and intelligent employees the space they need to accomplish goals, creating the Silicon Valley working style so common today.

Noyce received a bachelor's degree in physics and mathematics from Grinnell College in 1949 and a Ph.D. in physics from Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1953. He died unexpectedly on June 3, 1990.

TOP

Judy Odom is a member of the 2003 Industry Hall of Fame inductee class.
As co-founder and CEO of Software Spectrum, Odom helped grow a small retail shop into a multi-billion dollar global software-reselling empire, blazing many trails for the IT channel and software industry along the way. Ashe and her former husband, Richard Sims, started out selling Lotus 1-2-3 and Ashton-Tate's database before joining forces with Microsoft. That alliance boosted both companies' revenues and fortunes as they took on rivals such as Corporate Software and ASAP Software. Software Spectrum also established relationships with EDS and Halliburton and forged a distribution agreement with Micro D (now Ingram Micro).

The company's growth and prominence gave them leverage to help change the industry. Software developers initially required their resellers to maintain a retail operation, but Odom and several peers helped convince the major publishers to open up their distribution model. That created an opportunity for Software Spectrum to significantly grow its corporate sales, which also opened the market for companies like Microsoft.

Odom retired from Software Spectrum in August 2002, shortly after selling the company to Level 3 Communications. She is a 1984 graduate of Texas Tech, receiving a bachelor's degree in business and accounting.

Ken Olsen is a member of the 2000 Industry Hall of Fame inductee class.
Olsen helped reshape the computer industry when he co-founded the Digital Equipment Corporation (DEC) in 1957. He spent the next 35 years pioneering interactive computing and inspiring an open corporate culture that fostered a free flow of ideas. With Olsen as CEO, DEC would become the second-largest computer company in the world, employing more than 120,000 people in more than 95 countries. At its peak, revenue reached $14 billion and it ranked among the most profitable companies in the nation.

Olsen was an avid engineer and received patents for a number of technologies through the years, including the saturable switch, a diode transformer gate circuit, an improved version of magnetic core memory, and the line printer buffer. Despite the aspiration of DEC's engineers, he was highly critical of personal computers and prevented his team from designing its own. Olsen retired from the company in 1992 and, six years later, DEC was acquired by Compaq Computer.

Olsen received a bachelor's degree in electrical engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1950, and earned a master's in the same discipline in 1952. He died February 6, 2011.

Ray Ozzie is a member of the 1999 Industry Hall of Fame inductee class.
Ozzie is widely regarded as a pioneer in collaborative computing, having had a hand in numerous technology innovations over his career. His development start star rose quickly, leading him to be recruited by Lotus to create the company's Symphony Business productivity software. In 1984, Ozzie left to found Iris Associates and designed the product that would later be marketed as Lotus Notes. The circle continued in 1994 when his company was purchased by Lotus, which was acquired by IBM the following year. Ozzie founded Groove Networks in 1997 and, when Microsoft purchased the company eight years later, he became the software company's chief technical officer.

He assumed the chief software architect's role in 2006 when Bill Gates decided to step down. In that role, Ozzie was responsible for oversight of Microsoft's technical strategy and product architecture. He retired from Microsoft in 2010.

He received a bachelor's degree in computer science from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in 1979.

TOP

Earl Pace has been in the IT industry since 1965, starting his career as a computer programmer trainee with the Pennsylvania Railroad. Over the next decade Pace held a series of increasingly senior positions, culminating with his work as vice president of a financial telecommunications company in Philadelphia. In 1976, he started his own company, Pace Data Systems, a full-service IT firm providing services to banks, financial institutions and other customers from offices in Philadelphia and Washington, D.C.

In 1975 Pace co-founded Black Data Processing Associates (BDPA) in Philadelphia and operated as its president for two years. In 1978 he coordinated the formation of BDPA into a national organization and functioned as its first national president until 1980. Black Data Processing Associates has grown into the largest national professional organization representing minorities in the IT industry.

David Packard is a member of the 2000 Industry Hall of Fame inductee class.
In 1939, Packard and Bill Hewlett started HP (Hewlett-Packard) with just $538 and an idea. The duo designed and built their first offering in Packard's garage, selling the sound oscillator to the Walt Disney Studios. To support the war effort, the company quickly expanded its facilities and products, which included aviation and nautical instruments, radios, radar, and sonar devices. After incorporating in 1947, Packard became HP's first president and served in that role until 1964 when he was elected Chief Executive Officer and Chairman of the Board.

Packard stepped down in 1969 to become U.S. Deputy Secretary of Defense in the Nixon administration, but returned to HP two years later and was re-elected Chairman of the Board. He served the company in that capacity until 1993, when he was named chairman emeritus and retired from day-to-day operations.

Packard was a fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, a member of the National Academy of Engineering and a lifetime member of the Instrument Society of America. He also was a co-founder and past chairman of the American Electronics Association. In 1934, Packard received a bachelor's degree from Stanford University and earned a master's degree in electrical engineering in 1939. He died on March 26, 1996.

TOP

Jeff Raikes is a member of the 2003 Industry Hall of Fame inductee class.
At the time he was inducted into the Industry Hall of Fame, Raikes was the longest serving employee at Microsoft, leaving in 2008 after 27 years with the company. His early years were spent driving the company's applications marketing strategy and shaping the design of Microsoft Office, which would become the world's leading business productivity suite. In 1990, Raikes was promoted to vice president of Office Systems and then served as group vice president of the Worldwide Sales and Support Group from 1992-2000. He continued drive sales, marketing, and service initiatives as a member of Microsoft's senior leadership team until his retirement.

Raikes was not idle for long, serving as Chief Executive Officer of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation since September 2008. He is also a trustee of the philanthropic organization, leading efforts to promote equity for all people around the world. Raikes drives strategy and creates relationships with key partners to ensure the success of the foundation's programs, which include global development, global health, and educational opportunities in the United States. He also serves as Chairman of the Board for the Microsoft Alumni Foundation.

Raikes received a bachelor's degree in engineering and economic systems from Stanford University.

Edward (Ed) Raymund is a member of the 1997 Industry Hall of Fame inductee class.
Raymund was a computer distribution pioneer, a noted philanthropist and an adventurer. In 1974, he founded Tech Data, originally selling data processing supplies directly to end users of mini and mainframe computers. By the late 1960s, Raymund was stocking and distributing high-volume sockets and capacitors in a precursor to the Tech Data business. As the computer industry flourished, the company added to its portfolio, including computer memory cassettes, 8-inch floppy disks and printer ribbons. The advent of the personal computer increased demand for monitors, printers and related supplies, which Tech Data added to it line card as well.

After transitioning the company into a wholesale distributor in 1983, he sold the organization to his son Steven a year later. Raymund remained with Tech data as chairman of the board, and was named chairman emeritus in 1991. Rather than retire, he became actively involved in philanthropic interests, including his contributions to his alma mater, historical societies, missions and museums. Raymund also lectured to business students and professors about his methods.

He received a bachelor's degree from the University of Southern California. Ed Raymund died on December 9, 2008.

Steve Raymund is a member of the 1999 Industry Hall of Fame inductee class.
His father may have founded the distribution company, but he gives his son Steve the credit for building it into the multi-billion dollar organization that operates in more than 100 countries around the world. The younger Raymund's first job at Tech Data was to create a retail catalog for the telemarketing department, though he also helped out in product management, purchasing, and anywhere else he was needed. When several top executives were hired away by a competitor, they took much of Tech Data's business and product lines along with them. Raymund and a loyal core of employees rebuilt the organization, both organically and through acquisitions, including Computer 2000 AG.

His team pioneered integrated distribution, shipping products directly to end users from the manufacturer. He rose from operations manager in 1981 to Chief Executive Officer of Tech Data Corp. in 1986, retiring from that responsibility in 2006. Raymund continues to serve as Chairman of the Board, a position he was elected to in 1991.

Raymund received a bachelor's degree in economics from the University of Oregon and a master's degree in international politics from the Georgetown University School of Foreign Service.

Edward Roberts is a member of the 2000 Industry Hall of Fame inductee class.
Roberts made an early and enduring contribution to modern computing. He created the MITS (Micro Instrumentation and Telemetry Systems) Altair, which many consider the first inexpensive general-purpose microcomputer, a machine that could be programmed to perform a number of tasks. Before its introduction in the mid-1970s, personal computers were mainly viewed as an expensive hobby for electronics fanatics. The Altair provided a platform for programmers, and Bill Gates and Paul Allen used one to write their first application: Microsoft Basic. In 1977, Roberts sold MITS to the Pertec Computer Corporation and retired from the computer industry.

After selling his company, he switched course to pursue his childhood dream of becoming a physician. Roberts earned his medical degree in 1986 from Mercer University in Macon and established a general practice in Cochran, GA. This career change reversed a decision he made years earlier while a pre-med student at the University of Miami, when his interest in electronics inspired him to switch majors. In addition to his later medical degree, Roberts earned an electrical engineering degree from Oklahoma State University in 1968.

Ben Rosen is a member of the 2000 Industry Hall of Fame inductee class.
Many will remember Rosen as the man behind Compaq Computer, the head of the venture capital organization that provided the financial resources needed to grow a successful organization. But he was also instrumental in the growth of other high-tech startups including Electronic Arts, Borland International, Lotus Software and Silicon Graphics. His ties to Compaq were most visible, having served as Chairman from the company's inception in 1982 until his retirement in 2000. Rosen even filled in as acting CEO for short period of time in 1999.

He left his mark throughout the computer industry, funding a number of pioneering companies through Sevin Rosen Management, the organization he founded in 1980 with L.J. Sevin. The firm provided seed money and business insight for a number of high-tech startups, including access to a talented team of lawyers and management experts who could turn entrepreneurial dreams into successful business ventures. Before becoming a venture capitalist, Rosen spent four years analyzing high-tech stocks for mutual fund and worked at Morgan Stanley as an electronics analyst from 1965 through 1979.

He received a bachelor's degree from the California Institute of Technology in 1954, a master's degree from Stanford University in 1955 and an M.B.A. from Columbia Business School in 1961.

Mort Rosenthal is a member of the 2001 Industry Hall of Fame inductee class.
In 1982, when Rosenthal founded Corporate Software, businesses could only buy software through retail outlets or catalogs, and purchasing those offerings and getting support from a reseller was unheard of. He started his computer career in 1979 with Infocom, where he gained the industry experience and understanding he would need to devise a more efficient business model. When he launched Corporate Software, Rosenthal put an emphasis on business sales and offering premium support and service. Beyond the physical software sale, the company also provided outsourced software licensing and software asset management. He pioneered the outsourced help desk promised to keep his clients' businesses up and running with the quality support.

Rosenthal also introduced a Corporate Software catalog, which became popular in the business community and helped them drive sales and awareness of the company's offerings. Their first IPO was completed in 1987, with additional public offerings in 1988 and 1991. Prior to taking Corporate Software public, Rosenthal was able to convince Lotus to drop the retail shop requirement for distribution, and quickly closed the rarely used part of their operation. A few years later, he engineered a management buyout and took the company private again. After Rosenthal acquired 800 Software from Digital Equipment, he merged his operations with the Global Software Services unit of R.R. Donnelley to form Stream International. In 1996, he stepped down and is currently the CEO for Enterprise Mobile, Inc.

Rosenthal earned a bachelor's degree from Yale and received a master's degree in business administration from Columbia.

Michael Ruettgers is a member of the 2002 Industry Hall of Fame inductee class.
After becoming president and CEO of EMC in 1992, Ruettgers successfully transformed storage from a computer "peripheral" to an intelligent platform at the heart of all business processes. The company was first to develop mainframe RAID (redundant array of independent disk) systems, which radically altered the way information was accessed and stored. It was also first to introduce systems capable of simultaneously storing data created by different server platforms. Ruettgers was the hand guiding these developments, including EMC's entry into the storage software market.

After stepping down from his CEO position in 2001, he was named Executive Chairman of the Board of Directors, a post he held until 2004. Prior to joining EMC Corporation in 1988, Ruettgers was Chief Operations Officer at TFS. He spent much of his early career with Raytheon and remains the company's Lead Director.

Ruettgers received a bachelor's degree from Idaho State University in 1964 and an MBA from Harvard Business School in 1967.

TOP

W.J. (Jerry) Sanders is a member of the 2002 Industry Hall of Fame inductee class.
In 1969, when a group of Fairchild Semiconductor engineers decided to start a new company, they asked Sanders to join them. When his stipulation that he become president was met, the group left to create Advanced Micro Devices (AMD). Sanders would become CEO as well as the company's consummate salesperson, always available to lend a hand in tough negotiations and to close significant deals. He also believed in sharing AMD's success with its employees, becoming the first company to give everyone stock options. At the end of the company's first $1 million quarter, Sanders handed a $100 bill to every employee as they left the building.

He also saw AMD through tough times, including a bad recession in 1974, when Sanders negotiated a deal with a distributor that essentially saved them from bankruptcy. In 1982, he negotiated an agreement to serve as a second source to Intel for IBM PC microprocessors, which eventually narrowed the competition down to the two rivals. Sanders refused to lay off employees during difficult economic periods, perhaps a lesson learned years earlier from the frequent layoffs at Fairchild. After ushering AMD through almost 30 years of growth, he retired in April of 2002.

Sanders graduated with a bachelor's degree in engineering from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in 1958.

Izzy (Israel) Schwab is a member of the 2002 Industry Hall of Fame inductee class.
Schwab joined D&H in December 1957, initially selling appliances and electronics in the Baltimore office. Co-founded by his father David Schwab in 1918 as Economy Tire and Rubber, the company evolved into a leading RCA and Whirlpool distributorship. For decades, those brands accounted for more than 80% of D&H's revenue. As president and later CEO, Schwab helped D&H transition into the computer business, lessening the grip those manufacturers had on their business.

In 1988, RCA abandoned their independent distributors to sign on with major retailers. Schwab had to drastically and quickly change the D&H business model, becoming a source for indirect computer and electronics sales virtually overnight. The old RCA parts department now handled circuit boards and other electronics components, and a few peripherals manufacturers granted them distribution rights. Throughout the transition, D&H continued to remain profitable, which many attribute to Schwab's guiding hand. He assumed the role of CEO in 2000 and celebrated 50 years with the company in 2008.

Stan Shih is a member of the 1999 Industry Hall of Fame inductee class.
Shih is a world renowned inventor and entrepreneur, who created a number of respected technologies and businesses over a long career. He first put his mark on the industry in 1971 when at Unitron Industrial Corp., where he designed, developed and commercialized one of the first desktop calculators. The following year, he helped found the Qualitron Industrial Corp. and led the team that created the world's first pen watch. Shih and four partners then co-founded the Multitech International Corporation, the forerunner to Acer that developed and marketed microcomputers and related technologies.

For 23 years he served as the company's CEO, before retiring in 2004 to start iD SoftCapital with a group of venture capital veterans. Shih served as Group Chairman of the asset and fund management firm, which also provides consulting services for emerging businesses.

Shih graduated from the National Chiao Tung University in Taiwan, where he earned both bachelor's and master's degrees in electrical engineering. He also received honorary degrees from a number of prestigious institutions from around the world.

Alan Shugart is a member of the 1997 Industry Hall of Fame inductee class.
Shugart was a respected engineer and entrepreneur, best known for his development of the world's first disk drive. He began his career IBM career in 1951 as a field service engineer, repairing punch card accounting machines, later transferring to the company's research laboratory. In 1959, it was there that he helped develop Ramac (random access method of accounting and control), a disk drive which could store five million characters of data. Over the next 18 years, he managed the development of a number of IBM projects, including the 50 MB disk system used as the foundation of the Sabre online reservation system.

After leaving IBM in 1969, he worked briefly for Memorex and then founded his own company (Shugart Associates), where he designed and marketed a low cost 8-inch floppy disk drive before taking an industry sabbatical for several years. He joined with long-time collaborator Finis Conner to found Seagate Technology in 1979, where they introduced a 5.25-inch hard disk. With the advent of Apple Computer and the PC, its success propelled the company to a leadership position in the storage industry.

Shugart received a bachelor's degree in engineering physics from Redlands University in 1951.

Gil Shwed is a member of the 2007 Industry Hall of Fame inductee class.
At the age of 18, Gil Shwed joined Unit 8200, the intelligence arm of the Israeli Defense Forces and was assigned the task of securely connecting military computer networks. After leaving the service in1990, he decided to leverage his experience in code decryption and signal intelligence and, along with a couple of colleagues, developed and released FireWall-1. As part of their endeavor, the team created and patented its stateful inspection technology and founded Check Point Software Technologies. By 2002, the company had developed a substantial reseller channel and its products were part of the security infrastructure of most Fortune 500 organizations.

Co-founder Gil Shwed serves as the company's chairman of the board of directors and Chief Executive Officer. Under his leadership, the organization has established offices and industry alliances around the world, including corporate headquarters located in Tel Aviv and Redwood City, CA.

Shwed is a member of the Board of Trustees of Tel Aviv University and the Chairman of the Board of Trustees of the Youth University of Tel Aviv University.

Alvy Ray Smith is a member of the 2004 Industry Hall of Fame inductee class.
Not only did Smith co-found two successful companies (Pixar and Altamira), but he became a legend for his contribution to graphic arts. Despite being surrounded by movie and technology legends such as George Lucas, Steven Spielberg and Steve Jobs, he invented the technologies that made many of their films possible. Smith created the Lucasfilm Computer Division with Ed Catmull, developing a variety of computer graphics software including early renderer technologies. One of the duo's projects, Pixar was later spun off with a major investment by Steve Jobs. Smith went along, becoming Executive Vice President and serving on the Board of Directors until his 1991 departure from the company.

After leaving Pixar, he got together with Eric Lyons and Nicholas Clay to found Altamira Software, where they developed object-based drawing and image editing applications. When that business was acquired by Microsoft in 1994, Smith became the company's first Graphics Fellow.

He received numerous industry honors over the years, including two technical Academy Awards for his alpha channel concept and digital paint systems. Smith continues his passion for the visual, founding and managing his own digital photography company, Ars Longa.

After receiving a bachelor's degree in electrical engineering from New Mexico State University in 1965, Smith went on earn a doctorate in computer science, with a dissertation on cellular, from Stanford University in 1970.

Gary Starkweather is a member of the 2002 Industry Hall of Fame inductee class.
Notable for the invention of the laser printer and color management, Starkweather holds 44 patents in the imaging, color and hardcopy devices. While he realized early in his career at Xerox that a computer would do a better job generating a copy than a fax machine, it wasn't until he was assigned to the Palo Alto Research Center (PARC) that his vision would be realized. By 1973, he had devised a system to put his theory into practice and worked with other researchers to create the first fully functional laser printer. The company incorporated much of Starkweather's technology into a production unit, introducing the Xerox 9700 in 1977.

Starkweather left the company in 1987 to become an Apple Fellow involved in publishing and color imaging products and research. While there, he invented color management technology and spearheaded the development of Colorsync. He joined the Microsoft Research team in 1997, employing his skills to pursue innovation in display technologies.

For his work developing new methods of film input scanning with Pixar, Starkweather received a technical Academy Award in 1994. He graduated from Michigan State University in 1960 with a bachelor's degree in physics and completed a master's degree in optics in 1966 at the University of Rochester.

Michael Stonebraker is a member of the 2000 Industry Hall of Fame inductee class.
After years of dedicated research and application, Stonebraker's findings and designs have become essential components of many relational database systems on the market today. He was also active in the business community, having founded a number of companies, including Ingres, Illustra, Cohera, StreamBase Systems, Vertica, VoltDB, and Paradigm4.

In 1973 Stonebraker and colleague Eugene Wong start researching relational database systems after reading a series of seminal papers published by Edgar Codd on the relational data model. Their INGRES (Interactive Graphics and Retrieval System) project showed that it was possible to build a practical and efficient implementation of the model. A number of ideas were generated are still used in relational systems today.

Stonebraker earned a bachelor's degree in electrical engineering from Princeton University in 1965 and received master's degree and Ph.D. in computer science from the University of Michigan in 1967 and 1971, respectively.

Ralph Szygenda is a member of the 2003 Industry Hall of Fame inductee class.
As the first Chief Intelligence Office at General Motors, Szygenda was responsible for developing and implementing the organization's technology strategy, which was tied closely to transforming the automotive giant's extensive business processes. Accomplishing those goals required him to secure more products and services than anyone else in the world, adopting a multivendor outsourcing model that set the standard for the manufacturing community. Along the way, Szygenda taught a number of technology companies how to better leverage their products to solve business problems.

The streamlined and improved infrastructure that he developed reduced the time it took to deliver a vehicle from 70 days from 30 days and slashed the time to design a new car from 48 months to just 24. And Szygenda accomplished all of that by slashing his annual IT spending by 25%, without GM IT staffers writing a single line of code.

Prior to GM, he served similar roles for Bell Atlantic and Texas Instruments. Szygenda received a bachelor's degree in computer science from the University of Missouri-Rolla in 1970, followed by a master's degree in electrical engineering from the University of Texas in 1975.

TOP

The Thomas J. Watson Research Center is a member of the 1999 Industry Hall of Fame inductee class.
In 1945, IBM established the original Watson Scientific Computing Laboratory as a joint venture with Columbia University, located on the school's New York City campus. The number of research facilities expanded over the subsequent years, but the mission remained the same: to aid growth and development of information technologies, as well as the math and science that make it possible. Now based in Westchester County, New York, its three facilities employ more than 1,700 employees who conduct research in a wide range of areas, including computer science, electrical engineering, life sciences, materials science, mathematics, and physics.

The Watson Research Center played a key role in a number of notable inventions and innovations, including the development of: the first magnetic hard disk for data storage, the FORTRAN programming language, the Dynamic Random Access Memory (DRAM) chip standards, the relational database concept, the basics of compiler optimization for speech recognition technology, and the RISC (Reduced Instruction Set Computing) CPU architecture.

University of California at Berkeley Ninja Project is a member of the 2000 Industry Hall of Fame inductee class.
This project involved a group of University of California at Berkeley professors and graduate students that worked to construct a scalable architecture for online services and applications to run on next-generation Internet devices. The fault-tolerant Ninja platform was designed in 1997 to support thousands of concurrent users of various Web-enabled devices, including workstations, cell phones, pagers and personal digital assistants (PDAs). The research team created a scalable architecture that could run online services and applications on emerging Internet devices, with applications implemented in Java.

One program invention was the Ninja Jukebox, which allowed users to build a distributed, collaborative music repository delivering digital music to Internet clients. The Ninja Project also generated the Active Proxy Framework to access secure data through clients (such as stocks) and Ninja Mail, a scalable and feature rich e-mail service. A number of file sharing and mobile computing innovations can be attributed to the work completed during this UC Berkeley research program.

TOP

The University of Illinois NCSA is a member of the 2000 Industry Hall of Fame inductee class.
Founded in 1985 by a National Science Foundation grant, the NCSA (National Center for Supercomputing Applications) was created to provide supercomputer resources to universities and organizations engaged in scientific research. The program sponsored and facilitated the development of a host of computer inventions and innovations over the years and continues to deliver advanced computing, data, networking, and collaboration tools and support to the nation's researchers

Among its achievements was the 1987 release of the NCSA Telnet. This early network protocol allowed the simultaneous connection of PCs and multiple host computers. The MOSAIC web browser, credited by many for the Internet boom of the 1990s, was introduced a few years later. It was one of the first web applications to provide a multimedia graphical user interface with point-and-click capabilities, and was also the foundation of many subsequent browsers. The NCSA team is credited with a number of Internet innovations, including one of the earliest web servers (HTTPd) and an open source licensing program.

The University of Washington HIT Laboratory is a member of the 2000 Industry Hall of Fame inductee class.
The University of Washington's Human Interface Technology (HIT) Laboratory has been a pioneer in the development of advanced computer and virtual interfaces since its founding in 1989. Originally focused on virtual reality, its research has shifted from head-mounted simulation to various interface venues, notably voice recognition, gestural interfaces, augmented reality, wearable computers and digital entertainment.

The HIT Laboratory is committed to transferring technological innovation to the commercial world. Since its inception, 17 companies were founded as a result of the technologies developed in the facility, including Microvision and F5 Networks. A significant amount of the lab's funding comes from gifts and a 46-member Virtual World Consortium (VWC), including companies such as Microsoft, IBM and Ford Motor Company. The VWC members are able to license the technology developed at the HIT Laboratory for use in their own products and services.

TOP

Roy Valee is a member of the 2007 Industry Hall of Fame inductee class.
He began his career in distribution back in 1971, stocking shelves while he developed a long-term plan to start his own business. A few years later he joined Hamilton/Avnet Computer and worked his way up through the ranks, including several operations and executive roles within the organization. Valee was elected to Avnet's board of directors in 1991 and was appointed president and chief operating officer a year later. In 1998, he was appointed CEO and chairman of the board and continued to serve in that capacity until retiring from day-to-day responsibilities in 2011.

Respectfully referred to as "The Senator" by his peers, Valee is revered by his colleagues as a genuine, well-spoken CEO who cultivates loyalty through his ability to devise and execute complex plans. He has been active in the industry throughout his career, a longtime member of Global Technology Distribution Council and former chairman of its executive committee. As an advocate of the channel, he continues to work closely with solution providers, manufacturers and other distributors around the world to improve the supply chain.

Valee serves on the Twelfth District Economic Advisory Council for the Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco (FRBSF), providing information on current and pending developments in the regional and national economy. He also participates in Greater Phoenix Leadership and is a board of director member for Teradyne and Synopsys, Inc.

Jane Cage
Jane Cage
Steve Harper
Steve Harper
Ted Warner
Ted Warner

VTN Founders: The Ingram Micro VentureTech Network started in 1992 with Intelligent Electronics and a small group of its solution provider franchise owners. This peer community gave SMB resellers a greater voice in the industry. That successful organization was acquired by Ingram Micro several years later and renamed the VentureTech Network.

TOP

Charles Wang is a member of the 1998 Industry Hall of Fame inductee class.
Wang got his first job as a computer programmer at Columbia University, despite the fact that he had never used a computer before. But his strong communication skills allowed him to succeed. After he worked on a couple programs, Wang knew that he had found his calling. After trying his hand at software sales, he worked his way up the ladder to become vice-president of sales at Standard Data Corp. But he left in 1976 to pursue his passion of entrepreneurship and founded Computer Associates (CA), using his personal credit cards to get the operations started.

Wang would continue leading the company for more than 25 years, expanding the organization through internal development and a series of strategic acquisitions. He built alliances with a number of technology companies, leveraging these relationships to expand markets and improve the interoperability of its software. Microsoft and Sun Microsystems were among CA's strategic alliance partners. Wang served as president and CEO throughout his career and retired from the company in 2002.

Wang received a bachelor's degree in mathematics from Queens College in 1966.

John Warnock is a member of the 1998 Industry Hall of Fame inductee class.
As a respected software industry innovator, Warnock holds six patents, has contributed numerous articles to technical journals and industry magazines, and is a frequent speaker on the impact of computing technologies on business and publishing. A respected and inspiring industry leader, Warnock was instrumental in developing some of the software industry's most pioneering technologies. He collaborated with Dr. Charles Geschke in the Imaging Sciences Laboratory at Xerox's PARC (Palo Alto Research Center), experimenting in computer science, graphics, image processing, and optics. Together they created the Interpress page description language (PDL), which provided a means to electronically describe complex forms like typeface.

When Xerox declined to develop the technology for commercial use, the two left the company to co-found Adobe Systems. With Warnock's strong management skills and Geschke's vision and passion, the idea formed the foundation of what would become one of the world's largest software companies. He was president of Adobe during the company's initial two years of operation and assumed the role of CEO for 18 more years, retiring in 2000. He remains co-chairman of the board of directors with Geschke and continues to shape the company's direction.

Warnock received a doctorate in electrical engineering (computer science), a master's degree in mathematics and a bachelor's degree in mathematics and philosophy from the University of Utah.

Chuck Wolande is a member of the 2003 Industry Hall of Fame inductee class.
Wolande worked closely with Comark co-founder Phil Corcoran to build a $1.6 billion solution provider and distribution business. The two shared the same office from the time they started the company (1977) until they sold it to Insight Enterprises in 2002, where they continued that workplace arrangement as vice chairmen. When Wolande and Corcoran launched Communications Marketing (shortened to Comark in 1981) they began by selling Memorex tapes, eventually evolving it into a distributor, mail-order company, systems integrator and solution provider business.

Wolande was an engineer at Jefferson Electric before founding Comark, and he shared a passion with Corcoran to start his own business. While he shared management with Corcoran, his role was to manage the company's operations, which included financial and logistical oversight. The company grew substantially over the years, due in at least part to the complementary management styles of the two business partners. Wolande served as president of Comark, which employed more than 1500 employees at its pinnacle. After the sale to Comark was completed, he and Corcoran became vice-chairmen of Insight.

Wolande graduated with a bachelor's degree from St. Mary's College in Winona, Minnesota in 1976.

Steve Wozniak is a member of the 1998 Industry Hall of Fame inductee class.
The co-founder of Apple Computer started out with small aspirations. When Wozniak couldn't afford an Altair personal computer kit, he decided to build his own machine using a less expensive microprocessor and several microchips. Along with his friend Steve Jobs, they named it the Apple I and set out building a business to sell pre-assembled personal computers. To finance their venture, Wozniak sold his programmable calculator and his partner sold his Volkswagen van. Weeks later, Jobs secured the company's first sale of 50 Apple I computers at $666 each. Jobs took on the task of marketing and Wozniak would focus on engineering, continuing to improve on his original design.

While their operation began with the duo building computer in a garage, that situation didn't last long.

By 1977, the Apple II was ready to market and the duo formed Apple Computer, Inc. When the company went public three years later, its stock value was $117 million. Wozniak figured significantly in Apple's original design success, including the Lisa and Macintosh. He took a two year leave of absence after incurring severe injuries in a 1981 plane crash, and exited the company in 1985 (though he is technically still an employee).

Wozniak received a BS degree in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science from University of California, Berkeley in 1986.

TOP

Xerox PARC is a member of the 1999 Industry Hall of Fame inductee class.
The Palo Alto Research Center (PARC) was founded by Xerox in 1969, giving the company access to a diverse group of skilled computer scientists and a number of West Coast universities. Located on land leased from Stanford University, many of its graduate students take part in research projects and the school frequently hosts academic seminars and other joint ventures. A wide variety of technologies were invented and advanced at PARC, including: the laser printer, GUI (Graphical User Interface), ARPNET (a forerunner of the Internet) and the computer mouse. Text and imaging were also a frequent research focus, leading to development of the WYSIWYG (What You See Is What You Get) text editor and InterPress, the graphical page-description language precursor to PostScript.

Many of the early developments were included in the Alto computer, which was used by researchers to further a variety of complementary technologies, including the Ethernet and printing devices. PARC has employed a number of renowned scientists throughout its history, with several founding their own companies. Its alumni went on to establish Adobe Systems, 3Com, and SynOptics Communications, as well as several industry associations and related research facilities.

TOP

Philip Zimmermann is a member of the 2001 Industry Hall of Fame inductee class.
Zimmermann was a pioneer in the encryption field, a computer scientist who created and published the Pretty Good Privacy (PGP) email software program in 1991. Offered as a free service for the fledgling Internet, it spread quickly across the globe and set off a three-year criminal investigation. At the time of PGPs release, export of cryptographic software was prohibited, and the federal government argued that the worldwide distribution was a clear violation. Despite the lack of a supporting organization and the ongoing prosecution, PGP became the world's most popular email encryption software. When the government dropped its case in 1996, Zimmermann founded PGP Inc., which was acquired by Network Associates Inc (NAI) in 1997, where he remained as a Senior Fellow for three years. In 2002 PGP was acquired from NAI by a new company called PGP Corporation, where he served as special advisor and consultant until its acquisition by Symantec in 2010.

Zimmermann was also principal designer of the cryptographic key agreement protocol for the Wireless USB standard. Before founding PGP Inc, he spent more than 20 years as a software engineer specializing in cryptography, data security, communications, and real-time embedded systems.

Zimmermann received his bachelor's degree in computer science from Florida Atlantic University in 1978.

TOP